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Putting the Pup into Biking
Gear for you and your dog.
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We bolted a plastic crate onto the “snapdeck,” over the back wheel. The crate worked well with holes for harnessing Paco and strapping things down. We added padding, blankets and attached waterproof fabric to pull over the top during rain. Paco loved the basket and became very attached to his home on wheels.
We bolted a plastic crate onto the “snapdeck,” over the back wheel. The crate worked well with holes for harnessing Paco and strapping things down. We added padding, blankets and attached waterproof fabric to pull over the top during rain. Paco loved the basket and became very attached to his home on wheels.

Dogs and bicycles aren’t meant to mix. At least, that is what I thought until I met Zoa, a dog-crazy, bike-loving girl from BC. Somehow our cycling-with-dogs experiment developed into longer rides around town, which developed into weekend excursions, which developed into us quitting our jobs, selling everything we owned, and embarking on an epic 10,000-mile bicycle adventure through Europe.

Along the way we experienced our share of joys and challenges, and learned a few tips to make cycling with dogs fun and safe.

Putting the Paws to the Floor
With moving bicycle parts and the unpredictability of dogs, holding a leash or cycling with a dog tied to the bike can be a catastrophe waiting to happen. One sudden jolt for a squirrel, and you’re toppling over.

If your dog is reliable and there is no danger from traffic, then letting your dog run off-leash while you cycle is one possibility. But with an unpredictable dog or where traffic is involved, you will want your dog safely harnessed and leashed to the non-traffic side of your bicycle.

Specialized bike/dog leashes are the safest way to protect your dog from pedals, wheels and traffic. The leashes attach to the seat post or the rear axle of your bicycle leaving your hands free for steering, while coiled springs act as shock absorbers, significantly reducing the force of an unexpected tug. (springeramerica.com, petego.com)

Keep in mind that hot, rough or asphalt roads may be abrasive to paw pads, so start slowly and, where possible, ride on trails or along grassy or sandy shoulders. Also remember that cycling/running can be thirsty work, so carry a good supply of water and a bowl for your dog to drink from. Water bottle carriers that screw into your bike frame can accommodate 20-ounce water bottles or common plastic bottles up to 48 ounces. If you are going off the beaten track or on tour you may want to consider a water bladder (MSR Dromedary) or a water filtration system (Katadyn).

Dogs on Wheels
Not every dog has the endurance of a Husky, and not every road is safe enough to let your dog run beside the bike. Fear not, help is on hand.

With a growing interest in sustainable transport, the full potential of the bicycle (and indeed the tricycle) is starting to be realized. Recreational toys are being turned into practical tools, and more and more ways of carrying children, pets and cargo are becoming available. Here are some of the dogfriendly options:

Baskets and carriers are suitable for carrying smaller dogs, and usually attach to the handlebars or back rack of a regular bicycle. (cynthiastwigs.com, solvitproducts.com)

Specialized dog trailers are suitable for carrying medium to large dog: Quality, prices, features and weight capacities can vary widely. A good indication of trailer quality is the warranty, which can vary from 30 days to a lifetime. (burley, cycletote.com, doggyride.com)

Longtail cargo bikes are similar to normal bikes, except the back wheel has been moved back about 15 inches. The extended area behind the seat allows for more storage options, a bigger basket and a bigger dog (up to around 30 lbs.).

Trikes often have the advantage of a cargo area in front of you, allowing you to keep an eye on your dog. The heavier frames are more suited to flat and undulating terrain. (Bakfiets  — available through U.S. dealers)

Which option you choose depends on your budget, where you plan to ride, the terrain you will be riding on and your dog’s size and personality. Some dogs hate the feeling of being confined, while others find it secure and relaxing.

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