Home
Lifestyle
Print|Text Size: ||
See the World From Your Dog’s POV
Canine GoPro
See the World From Your Dog’s POV - Go Pro

Bicyclists, skiers, snorkelers, hikers, skydivers, surfers and whitewater rafters have been using the rugged, razor-sharp GoPro camera to record their adventures for more than a dozen years. Now, dogs can go digital, too.

Several companies make dog photography mounts for the device. The GoPro Fetch ($59), for example, is available wherever the ubiquitous little cameras are sold. A comfortable harness that straps on securely around a dog’s neck and belly without restricting movement, it has two quick-connect camera mount points: one on the chest (to document surreptitious snacking) and one on the back (for over-the-head shots of squirrel chasing). Highly adjustable—it can be used on dogs from 15 to 120 pounds— it also includes a camera tether for added security. (Fotowelt, Kurgo and SmilePowo all sell similar mounts for $10 to $30.)

Aaron Roberts is a chemical engineer living in Raleigh, N.C. A recent graduate of North Carolina State, he works for a large pharmaceutical company in nearby Rocky Mount. Three years ago, he adopted a three-month-old brindle Plott Hound/Labrador puppy from the Wake County SPCA and named her Caroline; the two are inseparable. The Plott Hound is North Carolina’s official state dog; bred here as far back as the early 19th century to hunt wild boar, the breed is known for its intelligence, stamina, uncanny scenting ability and loyalty. But it’s Caroline’s benign Lab traits that make her instantly affectionate toward most humans. In fact, she doesn’t display much interest in other dogs, but is always curious about new human acquaintances.

“She’s also stubborn as a fence post,” Roberts said, “but I suppose that’s what made her ancestors such good hunters.” At 55 pounds, she’s not as large as some Hound breeds, which makes her fairly easy on Roberts’ car interior and dog-food budget. Caroline routinely watches Animal Planet from her claimed place on the couch, and comments loudly on certain scenes, especially those involving anything feline. Before Roberts trained her to respond to his call as well as cues to sit, stay, heel and lie down, she was a barely containable dervish of exuberance.

Roberts had been using his GoPro to shoot friends, selfies and scenics on weekends and vacation trips when he spotted the GoPro dog harness and decided to try it with Caroline on a visit to one of the city’s recreational lakes. He also bought a “floaty” that attaches to the back of the camera just in case it came loose in the water. He set the camera to shoot a frame every half-second, then released Caroline from her leash. She happily galloped off to investigate several other human/dog combos. Later, he sorted through hundreds of frames, looking for those few interesting, lucky shots. Once he found them, he adjusted color balance, contrast and cropping using the easy Instagram software.

“It’s fun for both of us,” Roberts said. “But I’m not sure appearing in The Bark is good for her. She’s already too full of herself.”

Print

Photos by Phil Bowie

More From The Bark

More in Lifestyle:
For Every Dog There is a Season
When Your Partner Doesn’t Want a Dog
Dog is Official Greeter at Assisted Living Home
Double-dealing Exposed in Woofieleaks
Friendship From a Shared Skin Condition
Dogs and Divorce: Who Keeps the Dog?
Why Losing a Dog is So Hard
Pink and Blue Accessories
The Great Furniture Debate
Pawternity and Mutternity Leave