Home
Print|Email|Text Size: ||
Species-Spanning Medicine
Pages:

Pages

That applies to the owners of afflicted pets as well as those who are afflicted themselves, or have human loved ones suffering from a disease. We’re eager to find cures. Dogs, being such perfect models for study, provide what may be one of the quickest routes to them. While a resurgence in the use of otherwise healthy dogs in intrusive experiments isn’t likely, the future (which seems to be getting here faster and faster) isn’t crystal clear.

This much is, however: fairly early in their domestication—and in what was perhaps one key component leading to it—dogs exhibited their ability to stand sentry, to serve humans by warding off dangerous, life-threatening intruders.

In a way, thousands of years later, they’re doing it again.

Pages:

Pages

Print|Email

John Woestendiek is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, editor of the website Ohmidog! and author of Dog, Inc.: How a Collection of Visionaries, Rebels, Eccentrics and Their Pets Launched the Commercial Dog Cloning Industry.

ohmidog.com

Photograph by Wendy Savage, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine
Illustrations by Tim Carpenter

More From The Bark

By
Julia Kamysz Lane
By
Shannon Fitzgerald
By
Sheila Pell
More in Healthy Living:
Cracked Paws: Natural Winter Care For Dogs
Reiki Works Wonders with Shelter Dogs
Dog Circovirus
Sleeps with Dogs
Teach Senior Dogs New Tricks to Stay Healthy
Vet School Profile: Colorado State University
Pounds Off Pups
Dog Grooming Tips for Summer
Second Opinion: Barbecue Blues
Fleas and Ticks