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States Go All In To Boost Their Dog-Friendly Tourism Attractions
Putting Out the Welcome Mat

Farsighted people at many state tourism offices are turning dogward to promote the benefits of travel to their states. From Virginia to Nebraska, Arkansas to Oregon, states across the nation are catching on that dog lovers—who are inclined to include their dogs in their vacation plans—are a perfect target audience.

Better yet, it gives them good opportunities to promote their states’ own homegrown, dog-friendly businesses, from pet shops/boutiques and lodging, dining, hiking and recreational events to more out-of-the ordinary attractions —for example, Michigan’s ferry boat, the Isle Royal Queen IV, and Oregon’s dog-welcoming breweries.

Arkansas maps out its own pooch-friendly “Barkansas” itinerary; on the list is a stop at Crater of Diamonds State Park, where your dog can help you dig for gemstones. They also recently hosted a photo contest show-
casing dogs at their fave Arkansas spots; the grand prize was a dog-friendly in-state vacation. On their tourism website, they even have a special “get a dog” shelter link. So humane, so cool! 

Traveling northward, Wisconsin’s video campaign extols its canine chops with a winning slogan: “Dogs are welcome in Wisconsin, and they can bring their people, too.” The state of lakes aplenty highlights water features, festivals and fabulous off-leash trail programs like the 160-acre OLA that borders Ice Age National Scenic Trail at Prairie Moraine County Park at Verona. Or, near Madison, Lake Kegonsa State Park has a pier where you can teach your dog to jump into one of the state’s 10,000 lakes.

THE GOOD LIFE

Nebraska has its own dog-friendly marketing program: “Visit Nebraska. Visit Nice.” So we asked Bark reader (and smiling dog entrant) Michelle Hultine to suggest some tips on her home state. She points with pride to Nebraska’s “Rails to Trails” program, notably in the northern part of the state. Also, she tells us, many small towns are in the process of repurposing and reclaiming abandoned rail corridors. In fact, one cuts through her hometown of Hastings and is now a trail for hikers and bikers that many people use to walk their dogs. Hultine also bragged that there are more linear miles of rivers in that state than any other. Who knew? She adds that since many of the rivers aren’t all that deep, dogs will sometimes walk across them. Splashing in shallow, slow-moving water: a perfect activity for a hot summer day. Very nice, indeed, and very welcoming.

GEORGIA’S WALKING CHALLENGE

Georgia State Parks & Historic Sites is hoping to encourage more people to hit the trails with their pups by creating Tails on Trails. The dog-walking club, which launches this weekend, features a seven-trail hiking challenge. Learn more about the program

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Claudia Kawczynska is The Bark's co-founder and Editor-in-Chief.

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