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Karen B. London
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Strut Your Mutt
What’s the best dog event around?
A tired but happy Lucky shows off his new medal.

Recently I was a judge at “Strut Your Mutt” in Flagstaff, Ariz. The annual event is the work of Paw Placement of Northern Arizona, a local group that does great work finding forever homes for dogs and cats.

On this particular Saturday, we three judges had to observe dog-people pairs entered into the official “Strut” competition and determine three winners. The categories were 1) Best Strut, which was won by a Bulldog who successfully walked the entire loop multiple times (though was too tuckered out to come claim her prize); 2) Person-Dog Look-Alike, which was won by a willowy strawberry blond young lady and her fawn colored greyhound, both of whom looked lovely in their hula skirts, and 3) Judges’ Choice, which went to a three-legged dog named Lucky who had been adopted out by Paw Placement of Northern Arizona, and is indeed one of their great success stories.

Besides enjoying the event with its demos of canine sports and assorted vendors, and being thrilled about the fundraising success, “Strut Your Mutt” made me realize that we can never get too much of mixing and mingling with other people and their dogs en masse. It’s such fun to celebrate and enjoy the unique human-canine bond, and the fact that such events lead to happiness all around—in both species.

What events happen in your area to inspire interspecies fun, and perhaps raise money to spread that joy around still further?

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer whose clinical work over the last 17 years has focused on the evaluation and treatment of serious behavioral problems in dogs, especially aggression. Karen has been writing the behavior column for The Bark since 2012 and wrote The Bark’s training column and various other articles for eight years before that. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University, and teaches a tropical field biology course in Costa Rica. Karen writes an animal column, The London Zoo, which appear in The Arizona Daily Sun and is the author of five books on canine training and behavior. She is working on her next book, which she expects to be published in 2017.

Photo by Liz Bohlke

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