Home
Lifestyle
Print|Text Size: ||
Sue Sternberg Creates A Dog Ethogram
Videos of dog behavior are interesting and informative.

Ethologists, those people who study animals’ behavior in their natural habitat, generally feel you need on the order of one thousand hours of observation before you know your study species. No matter how much you read and hear about behavior, there is no substitute for great quantities of time observing members of that species. Sue Sternberg has spent many times the requisite number of hours with dogs, and that is part of the reason that when I was learning how to be a canine behaviorist, she was one of the people from whom I learned the most. Now, the benefits of all those years of learning, observing and interacting with dogs are available to everybody in a whole new format: a video ethogram available from Roundout Valley Animals for Adoption.

An ethogram is a catalog of a species’ entire behavioral repertoire. So, the more a species has been observed, the more complete the list because even rare behavior has been observed. The video ethogram is a great source of information about dog behavior from someone who has spent thousands of hours with dogs and has been diligent about videotaping over the years. Examples of the type of behavior included in the ethogram are the flying shoulder rub, front paw jab and jump with clasp. In a proper ethogram, the names for each behavior are descriptive rather than functional. (That is, a term such as “head turn away” is proper because it’s descriptive, but a term such as “appeasement by avoiding eye contact” is functional and therefore not a proper term for a behavior in an ethogram.) As an ethologist myself, I’m happy to say that Sternberg gets this right: She does a great job describing and documenting the behavior without attributing functions to them.

Print

Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer whose clinical work over the last 17 years has focused on the evaluation and treatment of serious behavioral problems in dogs, especially aggression. Karen has been writing the behavior column for The Bark since 2012 and wrote The Bark’s training column and various other articles for eight years before that. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University, and teaches a tropical field biology course in Costa Rica. Karen writes an animal column, The London Zoo, which appear in The Arizona Daily Sun and is the author of five books on canine training and behavior. She is working on her next book, which she expects to be published in 2017.

More From The Bark

More in Lifestyle:
Traveling by Sea with Dogs
Pokemon Go to Help Pets
Four Military Dogs Honored
Summer Books 2016
A Statewide Ban of Doggies in the Window
Fourth of July Aftermath
A Dogs Grief
Why Were 24 Bomb Sniffing Dogs Killed?
Tennis Ball Bombs
Hiking with the Help of a Pup