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Techno Dogs
  • Dog Park Assistant (Sue Sternberg/iPhone): Catalogs canine behaviors and body language, including an extensive section on how to determine a dog’s play style(s) and match him or her with compatible playmates.
  • Dog Park Finder Plus (Dog Park USA/iPhone): Displays local dog parks and search results in both map and list forms. Details include ratings, fenced and unfenced markers, hours, days of operation
  • Dog Bells (Hungry Wasp/iPhone): Dogs thrive on routine, and this app helps you either establish or maintain one. It’s a simple, useful tool to remind yourself when it’s time for your dog’s medication, meals, walks … especially helpful when housetraining a puppy.
  • Pet First Aid (Jive Media Inc./Android & iPhone): Videos and step-by-step illustrations guide you through fi rstaid basics—a good app to spend some time with before you need it. Android & iPhone): Use the Internet to get off the Internet and be part of a community of likeminded folks—fi nd other local dogophiles and get together in real time.
  • Meetup (Meetup/Android & iPhone): Use the Internet to get off the Internet and be part of a community of likeminded folks—find other local dogophiles and get together in real time.
  • My Dog (Dog Info, USA/ iPhone): This “paw-pilot” tracks medical, training and diet schedules; provides a national business-service directory; and incorporates a travel guide with listings of verifi ed pet-friendly hotels and more.
  • Pet Poison Help (Pet Poison Helpline/ iPhone): Access a database of 250 dog-toxic substances, including photos, descriptions and symptoms; for added utility, call the helpline from within the app.
  • Map My Dog Walk (Subaru/iPhone): This fi tness motivator uses your phone’s built-in GPS to track (in real time) your outdoor excursions; among other things, the app marks your path on an interactive map and records important metrics.

Bio-Tech

Lightworks
In an unusual reversal, cold laser therapy was used on people decades before it was tried on dogs. Cold lasers, low-level lasers or light-emitting diodes, are noninvasive and are most often used to help dogs suffering from arthritis, dysplasia or other musculoskeletal pain. The laser’s red light penetrates the skin and reduces pain and inflammation by stimulating circulation. Over the past few years, laser technology has improved and so, reportedly, have the results.

Another type of light is said to help SAD dogs—those who suffer from seasonal affective disorder. A new Portland based company is creating light boxes similar to those used by humans; in fact, the founder was inspired by seeing how well his dog responded to the light box he used to treat his own insomnia. Taken in roughly 30-minute doses, the bright white light is thought to increase levels of serotonin and thus, a feeling of overall well being, which dogs seem to enjoy as much as we do.

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