Home
Behavior & Training
Print|Text Size: ||
Tension & Teamwork in Dog Training
Pages:

Pages

The tension between handler and dog is a symbiosis of a sort that I’ve rarely seen elsewhere. In the moment, the dog is intensely focused on the scent, so much so that you can tell if a bird moves by the swivel of the dog’s head or the flick of his eyes. His nostrils flare to catch the smallest scent molecule, and his tightly contained excitement is palpable. He is the epitome of tense but he is also very still at his core, driven by a primal desire but knowing that his best chance to fulfill it is to work as part of a team.

Because I have a great desire to train these dogs, I have to go through the fear of tension to a place of understanding— even if the understanding is that I could potentially screw up my good dog. I’m excited about exploring these aspects of tension because I recognize that tension turned to fear is of very little use unless you’re in a dangerous situation, and even then, it’s a quick-burning fuel.

Which brings to mind a term used in Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy: “dynamic stillness,” which I interpret as potency stored, like lightning in a jar, ready to be unleashed in the transformation of compression to kinetic energy. When a great bird dog points, it feels exactly like that to me. The human handler needs to get on the same energetic wavelength, or get out of the way.

As I watch dogs learn to trust what they’re being asked to do, even if they don’t understand it, I see light-bulb moments. Rather than backing off the level of tension, we help the dogs find better ways to handle it, and their intensity grows proportionally with their confidence level. I have always learned a lot from dogs, but this might be the biggest lesson yet. What is tension? Tension is wanting and yet waiting in the moment. It’s a powerful place to be.

This essay was adapted from a version that first appeared on the Good Men Project website.
Pages:

Pages

Print

Louise Thayer is a poet, photographer, horsewoman and bird dog trainer. Originally from Wales, she now calls the Dallas area home.

Illustration by CSA-Printstock

More From The Bark

By
Karen B. London
By
Karen B. London
By
Karen B. London
More in Behavior & Training:
B.A.T. Proactive Training Gives Dogs The Tools They Need To Succeed
Dog Behavior: Bite Inhibition Matters
Two Dogs Eat Ice Cream
Eugene, Ore. Bans All Dogs Downtown.
Ears Held Back
Dog Behavior: Beware of Simple Names for Complex Problems
Howling in Zootopia
The Top 10 Talking Points for Trainers
Colorado Kids Train Service Dogs
Resource Guarding Toward Different Species