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2013
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Terms of Endearment
Editor’s Letter
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Charlie - Bark Dog

Not that we need a holiday to remind us how much we cherish our dogs, but with St. Valentine’s Day fast approaching, it’s a good thing to ponder. Our newest dog, terrier-mix Charlie, whom we adopted about a year ago, has a lot going for him. As many of you may recall, we got him shortly after our 18-year-old terrier-mix Lenny died. I had grown quite attached to the sine qua non terrier nature and thought that young Charles had the same qualities as his predecessor—loyal to the core with an astute “on-ness.” But unlike Len, he also came with an overriding desire to “go to ground.” From his first night with us, sleeping next to me under the covers has been his preferred spot in the universe. It surprised me at first (plus, I feared he would suffocate!), but I quickly grew accustomed to our sleeping arrangement—it’s so endearing, and so him. The night starts with Charlie snuggled along my midsection, but by morning, he’s down at my feet (still under wraps). Does your dog sleep with you? In what fashion? Also, what do you find especially endearing about your dog?

Welcome to our new readers! The Winter ’12 issue was so popular that we sold out in mid-December, so this may be your first taste of The Bark. We kick off 2013 by putting the lid on winter and leaping into spring with zest. Julie Hecht helps us understand what all that barking is about; behaviorist Karen London explains why dogs have a fondness for novelty; and Rebecca Wallick talks to Ted Kerasote about his new book, Pukka’s Promise, in which he gives his prescription for longer-lived dogs. While we’re in agreement with much of what Ted says, we do take exception to a few of his positions, particularly his stance on spay/neuter. But debate is good, right?

John Woestendiek investigates the merging of human and veterinary medicine and the benefits that accrue to both species. We also look at the intersections between dogs and technology; as one amazing example, Emily Anthes interviews an orthopedic vet who creates prosthetic limbs. Plus, I whipped up a delectable treat recipe to share with you; there’s another episode of Lee Harrington’s “Chloe Chronicles,” in which Chloe has a marrowbone mishap (that’s also happened to our dog Lola, so definitely something to look out for); and Twig Mowatt reveals how forward-thinking shelters are making adoptions more accessible.

The Endpiece from none other than E. B. White, author of the classic Charlotte’s Web (among many others), is our valentine to you. In this timeless essay, which White wrote during WWII, he talks about his vegetable garden, urban chicken-raising and his irrepressible dog, all topics that are once again in vogue (though dogs have never gone out, thank goodness).

Now, another request. As some of you know, The Bark got its start 16 years ago as a newsletter, part of a campaign for off-leash dog parks that resulted in the establishment of a 17-acre OLA in Berkeley. We quickly expanded our publishing vision and today, Bark is the leading dog culture magazine in, yes, the world. But the subject of dog parks is still dear to my heart, and I’m itching to get back to it. Later this year, we hope to publish a comprehensive dog-park update, and I’d love to hear from you; please share your expertise, opinions and ideas. What do you think works best about the parks you visit, and what needs the most improvement—basically, what are the ingredients of a perfect dog park? Write to me at editor@thebark.com, or join the conversation online at thebark.com/dogpark.

Finally, like many other magazines, we’ve been battling the skyrocketing costs of printing, postage, paper and even ink. So, in order to continue giving you a high-quality product and keep subscription rates the same, we’ve decided to print four issues instead of five this year. These will be supplemented with two very special extra digital editions, which, along with our current digital versions, will be free to subscribers. The digital issues have a lot more bells and whistles than their print cousins, and are easy to navigate too. As a reminder to those of you who prefer your magazines digital-only, we now offer that subscription option as well. So, whatever platform you choose—paper, laptop, tablet or smartphone—Bark will be there for you.

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