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True Lives of the Pampered Pooches
Rich, fancy dogs might not have it better
It's not all good for dogs in the top one percent.

Is the life of the high-flying, super-indulged pooch really all it’s cracked up to be? Well, according to today’s story in the New York Times, about celebrity’s dogs behaving very badly, there are some real downsides.


Among the trials: dog parents tend to throw money rather than time and effort at a dog’s problems, large staffs can be confusing, multiple homes can be disorienting, and attending glitzy events with anxious parents can make the dogs anxious as well. Even being carried too much can make a dog neurotic.


Oh, and apparently when power brokers come home from a day of mastering the universe they just want to abdicate control—allowing dogs too much free rein, which leads to behavioral issues for which the dog will ultimately pay the price.


Suddenly, my simple, staff-free home is looking like a well-planned strategy for raising healthy dogs.


Lisa Wogan lives in Seattle and is the author of, most recently, Dog Park Wisdom. lisawogan.com
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