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Tucker’s Response to Twins
He likes the familiarity
Tucker prefers Steve, but is comfortable with his twin, too.

When my sons and I entered Tucker’s home and met him for the first time, he responded in his usual way—with general hesitation and some barking. He’s in no way aggressive, but he doesn’t warm up to strangers quickly. He looked at us, backed away, and didn’t seem too pleased to see us. Over the next couple of hours, he accepted our presence, and was much more relaxed. Still, he was definitely not acting the same towards us as he does with the humans in his family.

Hours later when my husband Rich came over, Tucker acted completely differently with him than he had with the rest of us. His demeanor was significantly friendlier. He rushed up to greet him in a relaxed way, and he didn’t bark.  He also looked completely confused and alternated between rushing up to my husband and running away from him.

It’s easy to understand Tucker’s confusion. Tucker lives with Steve, who is my husband’s identical twin brother, but he had never met Rich. The dog didn’t greet him as enthusiastically as he greets Steve, but their remarkable similarity was enough for Tucker to consider my husband “familiar” and to react to him without fear.

When Steve came home a little while later, Tucker went bananas in a happy way, leaping onto Steve, and exuding light-hearted glee from toe to tail. It was clear to us that Tucker knew the first twin to arrive that day was not Steve, but he didn’t treat him like he treats everyone else he is meeting for the first time.

When both my husband and Steve were present, Tucker loved to sit by both of them, but he would look at Rich in confusion, allow some petting, and them scoot closer to Steve and relax totally to the full body massage he received. He would look up, sniff the imposter, and go back to Steve.

The most relaxed Tucker ever was with my husband was on the day he borrowed Steve’s clothes. He was even more relaxed with Rich that day than usual, behaving almost the same way as he did with Steve. However, he sometimes seemed very confused, sniffing him excessively and periodically racing away, only to approach again for further investigation. I’m guessing that the familiar odor of Steve’s clothes was making it a little harder for Tucker to tell the two of them apart, but a little easier for him to feel comfortable around Rich.

Does anyone else have a story of a fearful (or any) dog meeting the identical twin of someone he or she already knows well? What about brothers, sisters, or parents and children who strongly resemble one another?

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer whose clinical work over the last 17 years has focused on the evaluation and treatment of serious behavioral problems in dogs, especially aggression. Karen has been writing the behavior column for The Bark since 2012 and wrote The Bark’s training column and various other articles for eight years before that. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University, and teaches a tropical field biology course in Costa Rica. Karen writes an animal column, The London Zoo, which appear in The Arizona Daily Sun and is the author of five books on canine training and behavior. She is working on her next book, which she expects to be published in 2017.

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