Home
Editors
Print|Text Size: ||
Is Your Dog Ready for the Solar Eclipse?

Monday is the big solar eclipse day. If you are wondering if you need to do anything special to protect your dog’s eyes, luckily most experts say there is little need to worry.

“On a normal day, your pets don’t try to look at the sun, and therefore don’t damage their eyes. And on this day, they’re not going to do it, either,” Angela Speck, director of astronomy and a professor of astrophysics at the University of Missouri, said at a news conference with NASA on June 21 in Washington, D.C.

Pet safety expert, Melanie Monteiro also agrees. She teaches online pet first-aid classes and is the author of “The Safe-Dog Handbook: A Complete Guide to Protecting Your Pooch, Indoors and Out,” and she says animals shouldn’t need the same eye protection.

“There’s really no reason to be concerned about that,” she told TODAY. “Dogs and cats don’t normally look up into the sun, so you don’t need to get any special eye protection for your pets.”

But if you are taking your dog out while watching the eclipse, Monteiro said putting them on a leash is important. And make sure if you are looking up at the eclipse (with special eclipse glasses, of course), make sure your dog doesn’t take your cue if you get overly excited and “look” at what is making you freak out.

"Animals are actually quite a bit smarter than we are when it comes to looking directly at the sun," says Michelle Thaller, deputy director of science for communications at NASA, which is including the Life Responds project as part of its citizen science outreach in conjunction with the eclipse.

Some of said though that dogs might appear upset or frightened, and perhaps howl, run away, seek cover—similar reactions associated with fireworks. 

Vox, has a great piece on everything to know about eclipses, and posed that question to Bill Kramer, from eclipse-chasers.com, he told them that:

“Some dogs bark at the eclipse,” he says. “Some dogs detect the emotion of the moment, or anxiety beforehand, and react accordingly. Never heard of one reacting like some do to fireworks or gunshots. The eclipse is a silent thing, except for the ambient sounds and cheers. ... Cats, on the other hand, are cats.”

Best bet is to keep your dogs inside, but let us know if you catch your dog doing anything out of the ordinary.

 

Print

Claudia Kawczynska is The Bark's co-founder and Editor-in-Chief.

thebark.com

Nicole Bratt, Creative Commons

More From The Bark

By
Claudia Kawczynska
By
Claudia Kawczynska
By
Cameron Woo
More in Editors:
Reporting Pet Food Concerns
Dog Temperament Testing Doesn’t Earn a Passing Grade
Reunion of Littermates
Can Photos of Cute Puppies Help Marriage Blues?
Summer of Love Redux
Caring too much for a dog?
“Downward Dog” Speaks to Mutt Lovers
The Bark Author Interviews
Dogs May Reduce Allergies and Obesity in Babies
How Dogs Interpret Facial Expressions and Audio Cues