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News: Editors
Recognizing Shelter Heroes

Behind every rescued animal there stands a group of unsung heroes. Those people who make dog and cat adoptions possible — a team of shelter workers, trainers, foster parents and volunteers who shepherd each animal from their first day to, hopefully, a forever home. With dedication, hope, expertise and above all, hard work … they persevere, believing that every animal deserves a second chance at happiness and love. We salute their commitment, and strive to bring their stories to light.

The Bark has partnered with Halo to proudly present SHELTER HEROES — a program that recognizes outstanding individuals helping homeless animals find their forever homes. For the next several months, The Bark will be shining the spotlight on these shelter heroes, as well as publishing the best practices and recipes for successful animal adoptions. Together, we can make a difference.

Do You Know a Shelter Hero? Do you know an animal shelter worker or volunteer who stands out for their dedication, innovation and hard work? Somebody who is making a special impact in your community? We want to hear about them and tell their story to inspire others. We want to recognize their efforts and share their success. Go to our online entry and help us find the real shelter heroes in your community.

One special hero will be selected to be profiled in The Bark and the shelter they represent will be provided with 10,000 bowls of Halo dog food, courtesy of Freekibble.com. Other notable heroes will be featured on thebark.com. For rules and eligibility, click here.

News: Editors
2015: The Bark’s Year in Review

As the year comes to a close, we look back at some of the ideas in dogdom that caught our attention. The world is forever changing with new health and science discoveries, advances in technology, and evolving ideas that impact our communities and relationship with animals. One thing remains constant though, the comforting companionship of our dogs and the bond we share … thankfully, some things never change.

Considering the big themes that had us talking (and writing) about in 2015, two topics rose to the top and suggest important shifts in thinking. The first combines new findings that tie together nutrition, health and science—nutrigenomics or the study of how foods affect our genes and how individual genetic differences can affect the way we respond to nutrients. Canine nutrigenomics is further evidence that good nutrition matters, and our conversation with leading researcher and author W. Jean Dodds, DVM, explains why. Dodds and Diana Leverdure also explored the importance of “brain food” or good nutrition for senior dogs. The microbiome ecology found in our dogs’ gut may prove the pathway to better health (and behavior). Bark contributing editor Jane Brackman, PhD, investigated these microscopic worlds with fascinating results. Scientific research and popular theory (gutbliss) are creating a new awareness of the importance a healthy gut to a dog’s well-being.

As dog lovers, we’ve always known that dogs enrich our lives in countless ways. New research continues to build that case empirically, none more important than a special report from Harvard Medical School. Get Healthy, Get a Dog is the first publication to compile hundreds of research studies from around the world that document the physical and psychological benefits of dog ownership. Taken together, these studies provide the most complete picture yet of the many ways in which dogs enrich human life: from lower cholesterol and improved cardiovascular health to weight loss, companionship, defense against depression and longer lifespans. Twig Mowatt delved into this landmark report and its importance.

The second big idea gleaned from 2015: If dogs are proving good for us, they can be particularly beneficial to children. A recent study reports that kids who live with a dog are less likely to be anxious than their peers living in homes without dogs. Other studies show that children with dogs at home were healthier overall, had fewer infectious respiratory problems, fewer ear infections and were less likely to require antibiotics. Researchers considered these results supportive of the theory that children who live with dogs during their early years have better resistance throughout childhood. Innovative education programs like Mutt-i-grees curriculum are testing the many ways in which dogs can aid in learning. 

Space does not allow us to list every worthy book, film and exhibit from the past year (and there were many), but we would like to note these special, memorable works:

George the Dog, John the Artist: A Rescue Story by John Dolan

The Shepherd’s Life by James Rebanks

Heart of a Dog, a film by Laurie Anderson

Rescue Road by Peter Zheutlin

Culture: DogPatch
Heart of a Dog: Laurie Anderson is a visionary

Laurie Anderson is a visionary artist and a pioneer in electronic music as well as a marvelous storyteller. She employs her voice, with its songlike phrasing (as in her 1981 hit single “O Superman”), along with instruments—some of which she invented—video and other acoustic props to weave her tales.

In her new film, Heart of a Dog, her beloved Rat Terrier, Lolabelle, takes center stage in an imaginative, lyrical, confessional narrative. As Anderson describes it, “It’s a series of short stories about telling stories.” Quoting David Foster Wallace, she adds, “Every love story is a ghost story.”

Over the course of this absorbing 75-minute film, she considers the deaths of her mother; her dear Lolabelle, whom she “co-parented” with husband Lou Reed; her friend Gordon Matta-Clark; and finally, Reed himself in 2013. Times critic A.O. Scott praised it as a “philosophically astute, emotionally charged meditation on death, love, art and dogs.” It’s also about learning to “how to feel sad without actually being sad,” as her Buddhist teacher instructed.

While the film offers a visual representation, it’s really Anderson’s Zen-calm narrative that conveys its message. Both film and score open with her recounting a dream in which she gives birth to Lolabelle. She then uses the dog as a springboard, digressing to a variety of other topics but always circling back to the dog. One of our favorite segments, “Piano Lessons,” is about how Anderson and Reed set up keyboards on the floor for their old dog (who was going blind), and used a clicker to train her to make music. As Anderson wryly observes, the dog’s playing “was … pretty good.”

The movie, which has a limited run, will be aired on HBO in 2016. Luckily for dog lovers and Anderson fans, Nonesuch just released its critically acclaimed soundtrack. 

Wellness: Healthy Living
Nail Trimming Tips

Gather up a high quality pair of trimmers and some styptic powder, such as Kwik-Stop or other product, to stop bleeding if you nick the quick.

You may want to sit on the floor with your dog in your lap, or have someone hold your dog on a table. Hold your dog’s paw firmly and push on the pads to extend the nail. Locate where the quick ends. With clear or light nails, it is easy to see the pink color where the quick ends. But with black nails you can look for a black dot on the underneath of the nail; that’s where the quick ends.

Trim the nail below the quick on a 45- degree angle, with the cutting end of the nail clipper toward the end of the nail. Make several small nips with the clippers instead of one large one.

In some cases, if the nails are brittle, the cut may tend to splinter the nail. In these cases, file the nail in a sweeping motion starting from the back of the nail and following the curve to the tip.

Go slowly, take breaks between each paw., and don’t forget the dewclaws. If you accidentally cut the quick, wipe off the blood and apply Kwik-Stop or styptic powder to stop the bleeding. It is not serious and will heal in a very short time.

Some important tips:

  • Trim a small amount on a regular basis rather than to try to remove large portions. Trim nails so that when the dog steps down, nails do not touch the floor.
  • Invest in a good pair of nail trimmers in an appropriate size for your dog. They can last a lifetime.
  • Make trimming time fun and not a struggle —“high-value” treats help, as too does a cheerful, calm presence.
  • Get more information about Trimming Nails.
Dog's Life: DIY
Seriously Cute Crochet Dogs
Ami Ami Dogs

Anyone looking to add an extra dash of kawaii (cuteness) to their canine crochet should take a peek at Mitsuki Hoshi’s book Ami Ami Dogs. These big-headed amigurumi (Japanese for knitted stuffed toy) fit in the palm of your hand, and Hoshi’s easy-to-follow patterns will have even novices needlers stitching them up in no time. Gather your crochet hooks and download the PDF below to test out the Beagle puppy Chihuahua pattern—and show off your results by emailing editor@thebark.com.

Update: We apologize for the confusion with the Beagle puppy pattern. We did not realize when we posted it that it referred to earlier patterns in the book. Harper Collins has graciously permitted us to post the Chihuahua pattern from Ami Ami Dogs, which is complete and does not depend on other patterns in the book.

Please note: If clicking the pattern doesn't prompt you to save it, then Right-Click the link below and select "Save Link As".

Culture: DogPatch
Paralympic Skier: Danelle Umstead
Visions of Gold

To have vision, says Danelle Umstead, “is to have sight, an idea or a dream.” Her immediate vision is to win gold for the U.S. in alpine skiing at the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Danelle’s husband Rob Umstead, her coach and sighted guide, will be leading the way through the courses.

Last summer, Danelle’s longtime guide dog, a black Lab named Bettylynn, developed optic-nerve atrophy and had to retire, so Aziza, her new canine guide, will be rooting the couple on in Sochi. Bettylynn, the first guide dog to represent the U.S. at the Winter Olympics in 2010, will be pulling for the couple back home in Park City, Utah, along with their son, Brocton.

When Danelle was 13, she was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic eye condition that eventually causes complete darkness. Her vision is “spotted,” and she can only see up to five feet in front of her. Even then, colors have to be highly contrasting for her to make them out, and she sees little to no detail. Then, in 2011, she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Still, neither of these hurdles has kept her from achieving her best.

Her father introduced Danelle to adaptive skiing in 2000 and acted as her guide. She quickly fell in love with the sport—the freedom, the speed, the exhilaration. She began training and working full-time with Rob in 2008, and competitive success soon followed: Paralympic Bronze medals at Vancouver (2010), nine World Cup podiums and Paralympics Alpine Skiing National Championships. Her success relies heavily on the 100 percent trust and communication she shares with Rob as he guides her down the hill at top speed. It’s similar to the trust and communication she had with Bettylynn and is working to build with Aziza.

Danelle and Rob have created Vision4Gold.org as a way to mentor junior disabled athletes by sharing her story and offering encouragement. We’re confident that Danelle will realize her vision.

Culture: Readers Write
More on Magnolia
Smiling Dogs

Magnolia's family volunteers with a rescue in North Carolina and she was a foster. When she came to them she weighed almost twice what she weighs today. She was on a lot of medicines for a variety of health issues because her previous owner didn't properly feed her. One med was for her heart.

She stopped eating anything that had meds in it and her family noticed her potty was slow drips. So they took her to the vet and got the quality of life talk. Meds for her heart were shutting down her kidneys and kidney meds would put fluid on her heart. They were told she didn't have long so let her do what she wants. They made her a sort of list similar to a bucket list, and that huge smiling picture was when they took her to the beach.

That was over a year ago and at the last visit her weight was normal and all her blood work was great. She's now about 6 pounds and very active. Looking back at where she was and where she is now I am so amazed.

News: Editors
Hurricane Katrina Remembered: Survivors’ Tales

When the juggernaut that was Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005, it taught the nation some hard lessons about the need to provide disaster assistance for both people and their companion animals. When told by emergency personnel that they couldn’t bring their four-legged family members with them, many chose to stay behind rather than abandon the dogs and cats who trusted them.

In the days and weeks that followed, groups and individuals from across the country converged on the Gulf Coast for what’s been called the largest animal rescue operation in history. The following year, Congress passed the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS) Act, which directed FEMA to take the essential needs of individuals with household pets and service animals, and of the animals themselves, into account.

Ten years on, the phrase “Not without my dog” has been taken seriously, and the depth of emotion that binds us to our animal companions continues to inspire.

BREED EXEMPLAR

Sally. Among the first group of dogs evacuated from New Orleans by the Marin Humane Society, Sally landed at San Francisco International Airport on September 11, 2005, and within hours, was charming the local media right out of its collective socks. A few days later, she was photographed for her debut as Bark’s Winter 2005 cover dog. According to her person, Sheri Cardo, 11-year-old, Sally continues to spread her Pit Bull love far and wide. 

AIDE-DE-CAMP

Katrina. While Bill Daugaard was leading a rescue team in New Orleans’ Eighth Ward in September 2005, he watched the liberation of a dog (above) who had been locked in a house for 22 days. Something about her spoke to him, but before he could put his name in to foster her, she was on her way to Los Angeles. Long story short, he found her, adopted her, named her Katrina and took her home to Seattle.

ADOPTION HELPER

Boots. The Golden/Chow mix with the badly burned feet was rescued from St. Bernard Parish by a group of EAMTs from the Arizona Humane Society and transported to AHS’s Second Chance Animal Hospital in Phoenix for treatment. Shortly thereafter, his foster home became his forever home. For the past two years, Boots (above) has been returning the favor by volunteering as AHS’s kitten nanny, helping five- to eight-week-old felines acclimate to dogs (and thus become more adoptable).

SQUADRON MASCOT

Katrina. Each time a helicopter from the 301st Rescue Squadron landed on the 1-10 overpass in New Orleans to take on stranded hurricane victims, an intrepid little Beagle would rush toward the craft and station herself nearby. On the last run, Pilot Mike Brasher  (above) and his crew realized that she was alone, and took her with them. Brasher adopted her, and she became his squadron’s mascot. Now 15, she lives the good life in Fla.

Magazine: 2015-2017
Issue 82: Summer 2015

There are many reasons to think about the climate these days, including the drought where we are in California. And we learn in the summer issue that global climate changes 45,000 years ago might have also played a hand in ancient humans teaming up with proto dogs. Together they were able to survive an ice age that downed many other species, including the Neanderthals. Pat Shipman tells us just how fortutious we are that friendly wolves joined our campsites! So it’s rather perfect that in this issue, we look at the many reasons to be thankful to our first and best friends. Twig Mowatt follows the story behind “Get Healthy, Get a Dog,” a Harvard Medical School study that concluded that the way to a have a healthy life is to share it with a dog. Handily, Karen London provides us with tips on choosing the right dog. Rebecca Wallick looks at dogs’ remarkable ability to sniff out disease, and how it’s opening doors to earlier cancer detection and better understanding of the disease. Psychologist Marian Silverman relates how her therapy dog, in overcoming her own fear, helped young patients gain invaluable insights. Plus, we have an excerpt from a new memoir, George the Dog, John the Artist, by John Dolan; in it, a stray Pit provides the reason, and the inspiration, for a man to turn his life around. And as an apt testament to the value dogs have to us, Alexandra Anderson describes a program at the University of Pennsylvania that is helping train and raise dogs for search-and-rescue work, saving countless lives worldwide.

Then, Judy Jennings recounts an epic road trip—and a spiritual migration—from Maine to the Yukon made by noted photographer Linda Griffith, accompanied only by her two dogs.

The inner dog also gets quite a bit of attention in this issue. In an excerpt about “brain foods” from a breakthrough new book, Canine Nutrigenomics, by W. Jean Dodds, DVM, and Diana Laverdure, we learn that food “speaks” to the body at the cellular level, which in turn plays a role in determining our dogs’ health (and our own). See our exclusive interview with Dr. Dodds here.

From cells, we move to the microbiome, an invisible world of the hundred trillion bacterial, viral and fungal microbes that live on and in us and our dogs. Jane Brackman takes us on a tour of the research into this microscopic universe, and what it may reveal about pathways to better health. We look at canine chronic renal disease and its management, and consider low-stress handling and why it’s so important to our dogs. And then for a twist on separation anxiety, Tracy Krulik looks at how this condition can be a two-way street. We take a gander at one of the best and largest dog parks in the U.S., the Off Leash Area in Shawnee Kansas with so much going for it, including spaciousness and wise-management. From tips on finding shed antlers, to book, comics, movie and theatre reviews—and a glimpse of one amazing doghouse, we have packed this summer issue with a host of informative and entertaining articles. So whatever the weather’s like where you are, take it slow and easy this summer, and take time to enjoy some fun with your co-pilot and dig into Bark’s offerings. You can subscribe to the magazine and ensure getting this issue, or buy a single copy too.

FEATURES

Get Healthy, Get a Dog: Harvard Medical School study makes it official, dogs are good for us. By Twig Mowatt

Brain Food: What we feed our dogs has a nose-tail affect on their quality of life. By W. Jean Dodds, DVM and Diana Laverdure, MS

Gut Feeling: Exploring the microscopic ecology of the microbiome. By Jane Brackman, PhD

North to Alaska: Suburban dogs share an epic road trip into the wilderness. By Judy Jennings, Photographs by Linda Griffith

George, The Dog Who Saved My Life: A stray Staffordshire Terrier provides the reason, and the inspiration, for a man to turn his life around. Text and art by John Dolan

Letting Go:  A therapy dog overcomes her own fear and helped young patients gain invaluable insights. By Marian Silverman

ENDPIECE Strawberry Blond: An unforgettable gardening buddy. By Eileen Graham

It’s a Dog’s Life

HEALTH: Canine Chronic Renal Disease. By Sara Greenslit, DVM

WELLNESS: Low-Stress Handling is the best approach to win trust. By Amy Kantor, VMD

COMICS: Rover Red Charlie By Mark Peters

DETECTION: Smell Test Sniffing out cancer. By Rebecca Wallick

BEHAVIOR: The (Next) Love of Your Life Choosing the dog right for you. By Karen B. London, PhD

PROFILES OF RESCUE: Donna Reynolds, BADRAP. By Jesse Freiden

Tethered by Love: Separation anxiety can be a two-way street. By Tracy Krulik

DOGS AT WORK: Training Working Dogs: A look at new program at UPenn. By Alexandra Anderson

AUTHORS SPEAK: Pat Shipman talks with Claudia Kawczynska about first dogs and probes into the disappearance of the Neanderthal.

Reviews

The Invaders; Canine Nutrigenomics; George the Dog, John the Artist; Scents and Sensibility; Strays

DOGPATCH

Guest Editorial: Slumber Parties by Judith Gardner

Asheville’s Aloft Hotel and Portland’s Inn by the Sea help in rescue efforts.

Mural Art “Homecoming” by Agostino Iacurci

Dog Parks: Kansas shines with Shawnee Mission Park Off Leash Area

Postcard from Down Under: Dog Buildings Extraordinaire.

Finding Shed Antlers by Cynthia Howle

Flea-Tick Diseases

Film review: Hungary’s White God by Devon Ashby

Smiling Dogs

Theatre Review: Comfort Dogs by Joanna Lou

Poetry: Irene Willis, Karen Ray

Dog's Life: Home & Garden
Earth Day Tips
Reduce Your Paw Print

This year we celebrate Earth Day’s 45th anniversary. This annual event is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement back in 1970. The passage of the landmark Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Today, events large and small raise awareness of the fragile balance we hold our planet, and educate to bring changes to the dangerous course we’ve set.

Our dogs bring us closer to the natural world, and help us appreciate the environment we share with them. They too will benefit by our stewardship improving. We all need to pitch in to make a difference. Here are some simple ways to raise eco-friendly dogs and reduce our mark on the world.

Adopt Rather Than Buy
The ultimate in recycling, go green by adopting a dog from your local shelter or rescue group. There’s a wonderful animal (both purebreds and mixed) waiting for a good home at your local shelter.

Spay/Neuter Your Dogs
It is the most effective way to reduce the pet overpopulation problem.

Choose Foods Wisely
Buy dog food that is made with organic and humane ingredients. Eliminating chemicals and additives in food is safer for your dogs and the environment. Better still, purchase locally produced food or make your own. Avoid plastic bowls, which can leach chemicals.

Make Waster More Eco-Friendly
Use biodegradable poop bags as opposed to plastic whenever possible. Consider installing an underground pet-waste digester in your yard.

Buy Quality
Cut back on landfill by buying fewer canine accessories, and investing in well-made, long lasting beds, toys and leashes and avoiding the disposable variety.

Buy Recycled
Purchase products that are made from sustainable, organic, and/or recycled materials.  Seek out companies with proven commitments to recycling packaging materials and waste products on the production end.

Clean Green
Use eco-friendly cleaning ingredients like vinegar or baking soda. There are many natural commercial cleaning products available on the market—non-toxic and safe for animals. Shampoos as well.

Grow Green
Plant a tree to celebrate your dog! Plant an organic herb garden, including parsley, thyme and rosemary to “spice” up your dog’s meals. These herbs can make a perfect kitchen-grown garden too.

For a more comprehensive guide to living green with pets … see more simple strategies for reducing your dogs’ paw print.

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