Home
The Bark
26_51
Weekly Smilers 7-28-14
Smiling Dogs
Butterball

Our featured smilers of the week. See more in our Smiling Dogs Gallery.

This week: Butterball, Edith, Belle, Chesney, and Janis.

News: Guest Posts
This Dog Loves Guitar!

This sweet pup, Doogie, who lists his personal interests on his facebook page as "Sassing anyone in a uniform." and "Being under the blankets." loves when his person Shane plays guitar! Watch the video below to see this adorable duo in action. We love how Doogie nuzzles up to enjoy the music!

26_51
Weekly Smilers 7-21-14
Smiling Dogs
Imhotep

Our featured smilers of the week. See more in our Smiling Dogs Gallery.

This week: Imhotep, Grover, Max, Tommy, and Lula.

26_51
Weekly Smilers 7-14-14
Smiling Dogs
Sabrina

Our featured smilers of the week. See more in our Smiling Dogs Gallery.

This week: Sabrina, Ryleigh, Bailey, Buttercup, and Presley.

News: Editors
Protecting Abandoned Animals with AB 1810
AB 1810 signed into law by California Gov. Brown

California—An important new bill has passed protecting abandoned animals has been signed into law in the state of California. AB 1810 removes a state mandate to euthanize any animal abandoned at an animal care facility, including veterinary offices, spay/neuter clinics, animal hospitals, and grooming facilities, if a new home is not found within 24 days. Additionally, AB 1810 provides more flexibility to achieve positive outcomes for these animals by permitting animal care facilities to turn the animals over to a local shelter—an option that is strictly prohibited under current law. Sponsored by Assemblyman Brian Maienschein (R-San Diego), AB 1810 was passed unanimously by both houses of the California Legislature and was recently signed by Gov. Brown. “Abandonment should not be a death sentence for animals,” Kevin O'Neill, senior state director of ASPCA Government Relations for the Western region, said. “Dogs and cats at spay/neuter clinics, veterinary offices, or any of California's many other care facilities should not face certain death simply because their owner fails to pick them up. It is imperative that we do all we can to ensure positive outcomes for these animals, and AB 1810 will do just that.”

26_51
Weekly Smilers 7-7-14
Smiling Dogs
Brooklyn

Our featured smilers of the week. See more in our Smiling Dogs Gallery.

This week: Brooklyn, Fabio, Harry, Rocsi, and Taj.

26_51
Weekly Smiler 6-30-14
Smiling Dog
Aiofe

Our featured smilers of the week. See more in our Smiling Dogs Gallery.

This week: Aiofe, Claire, Keller, Nala and Sadie.

26_51
Weekly Smiler 6-23-14
Smiling Dogs
Easton

Our featured smilers of the week. See more in our Smiling Dogs Gallery.

This week: Easton, Ginny, Journey, Maddie and Zoey.

Culture: Readers Write
From Birdbrained to Brilliant
Book Review

Those who share their lives with sporting dogs (as I do) face unique challenges: dogs who are hardwired to laser focus on anything that moves and have the physical stamina to run, leap and course for what seems like forever. Dawn Antoniak-Mitchell is well acquainted with these training trials, and in From Birdbrained to Brilliant: Training the Sporting Dog to be a Great Companion (Dogwise), offers sound advice on how to “work with the ‘sportiness’ in our dogs, instead of against it.” Many of these dogs, especially those used for hunting, have been trained using harsh methods to break them so they’re “biddable.” Luckily, this book subscribes to a much more humane, reward-based approach. Key points like how to motivate your dog and become her gatekeeper “for access to all good things” are stressed, as is creating and sticking with a training plan. As Antoniak- Mitchell observes, to teach your sporting dog to be a great companion, you must be as focused, enthusiastic and creative as she is. And it turns out that the secrets to achieving that goal are to be found in this very helpful book.

Culture: Reviews
Mountaintop School for Dogs
Book Review

Also due out in August is the must-read, The Mountaintop School for Dogs and Other Second Chances (Houghton Mifflin) by Ellen Cooney. This novel is a moving and joyous romp featuring impulsive, 24-year-old Evie, who is on a quest to untangle a troubled past by seeking a new life path as a dog trainer. Though she has scant experience with actual dogs, she applies for a position at the Sanctuary, which she thinks is a school for trainers. Apprehensive and excited, she learns that she must first spend time as the sole guest in a mysterious inn, overseen by a reclusive innkeeper. Little does Evie know that the Sanctuary is actually the command center for a network of underground animal rescuers led by four elderly ex-nuns.

All the dogs are wonderfully, fully drawn characters with heart-wrenching backstories. They reside at the Sanctuary, and Evie first encounters them when they are brought to her at the inn to assess her training skills. The dogs, Evie and, in fact, most of the other characters are all involved in some kind of transformative recovery program. The wounded dogs are tenderly given a place of refuge, while their f ledgling trainer/companion is tutored by a lama-like nun to “never, ever give a dog who comes to you anything but love.” This is a brilliantly crafted, uplifting book, with its message of “Rescue. Best. Verb. Ever” evident on every page.

Pages