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News: Editors
W San Francisco Hosts Summer "Yappy Hour" for People and Dogs

W San Francisco invites all dogs and their two-legged friends to join the hotel’s first Yappy Hour of the season from 5:30 pm-7 pm on Thursday, July 7. The summer party, taking place at Hunt Lane, an outdoor space adjacent to W San Francisco, will feature specialty cocktails and treats for both dogs and owners, a photo station and more pawsome fun. The signature W pink carpet will be rolled out for all guests, and star-studded pups Little Cooper Bear and Sailor the Doodle, Hula & Bean Sprout, Boe The Bear Coat and Sneakers the Doodle will be in attendance.

The world-class W San Francisco is pet-friendly hotel and welcomes dogs and cats to the property through its P.A.W. (“PETS ARE WELCOME”) program. The hotel enhances animals’ stay with dog-walking and grooming services. At check-in, guests receive pet toys, pet treats, a W Hotels pet tag, clean-up bags, details about pet services available through the Concierge team and items available through Whatever/ Whenever® service. Pet stays also include a custom W Hotels pet bed, food and water bowl with floor mat, a pet-in-room door sign, an in-room dining dog menu featuring 8 oz. pan roasted natural beef and grilled natural beef patty, and a special treat at turndown.

To RSVP for W San Francisco’s Yappy Hour, please email rsvpwsfevents@whotels.com

WHEN: Thursday, July 7, 5:30 pm-7 pm WHERE: Hunt Lane at W San Francisco 181 3rd Street San Francisco, CA 94103 COST: Cocktails: $13-15, Complimentary hors-d’oeuvres
News: Shirley Zindler
A Dogs Grief

When Malachi was first captured and brought to Dogwood Animal Rescue Project, he was a feral wolfdog who had been living wild and on his own for some time. He was terrified of people but he bonded tightly and immediately with our rescued Great Dane, Tyra. Tyra was frail and struggling with Wobblers Disease and other health problems but Malachi adored her.

Tyra was incredibly helpful in being a stable role model for Malachi’s interactions with people. Although he’s still somewhat feral, he’s made a lot of improvement and would come inside the house, lie near us and even greet us, just to be near her. As Tyra’s health worsened she fell often and Malachi would always rush to be with her and hover around her frantically as she waited for me to help her up. While the other dogs loved Tyra, they never seemed to notice her struggles. Malachi however was so distressed by her falls that he would get as close as he could, lick and kiss her mouth, curve his body around her and all but pat her back. At 120 pounds it was always a challenge to get Tyra up and as soon as she was on her feet again, Malachi would bound around her in delight, so happy to see his great love out of distress.

Tyra continued to decline and I knew it wasn’t going to be easy for Malachi to lose her. He had lots of other dog friends in the other permanent canine residents as well as endless fosters and visitors and he played with them by the hour but Tyra had his heart. Finally the day came where we couldn’t keep her comfortable any longer and my own heart was breaking as the vet came to the house to help us say good-bye.

The other dogs were out of the room as Tyra slipped away gently in my arms with my tears bathing her sweet face. She was in her favorite bed in the living room and a cat purred quietly on my lap as I sat with her for a few moments after the vet left. Finally I got up and let the other dogs in. In the past my dogs have shown a variety of reactions to the body of one of their companions ranging from intense fascination to little interest. But those dogs were more tightly bonded to me and Malachi was bonded to Tyra. She was his everything.

I was surprised to see the other dogs bounce into the room happily and carefree as ever. They literally leapt over Tyra’s body as they raced to grab their favorite toys or the most comfy spot on the couch.  Malachi who is so hyper-sensitive to every mood and nuance of behavior didn’t seem to notice a thing. After a few minutes of play he went over and lay in the bed next to Tyra but he seemed relaxed and happy. He flopped over near her and even wormed his way a bit closer. In the past she would have corrected him for getting in her space and he acted as if he were getting away with something when she didn’t. A few minutes later he was fast asleep next to her.

The dogs weren’t present when I buried Tyra and a couple of days went by where all seemed normal. I was thrilled that Malachi seemed to be coping so well. A few nights later Malachi refused to come back inside after the last potty break at bedtime. That’s not unusual as he occasionally prefers to sleep outside instead of in the bedroom with us. But the next morning when I let the other dogs out he wasn’t on the back porch waiting to greet them. Our property has a spacious fenced area so I assumed he was just distracted by something. As I went into the kitchen to make my coffee I glanced out the window. To my surprise, Malachi was in another of our yards, frantic and upset, running the fence. In my sleepy state I had trouble processing what I was seeing. How did he get in there? Had I left a gate open? I walked out to the gate and let him back into the regular dog yard. There was a huge hole under the fence where he had dug under, but why?  As I walked back to the house I glanced over at Tyra’s grave. To my horror, the dirt was pulled away and I could see a flash of black fur. I turned away, sick to my stomach. The shock of seeing my girl’s body again was so painful that I felt nauseous. I had buried her tightly wrapped in a sheet, lay flowers on top and covered her thoroughly.

After a moment or two I pulled myself together and walked over to the grave. Tyra’s body itself was undisturbed but the sheet had been ripped away until her shiny black coat was visible. In the soft dirt next to her was the imprint of Malachi’s body where he had lay next to her. I stood there for a long time with the tears slipping down my face and a lump in my throat. I was so saddened and touched by Malachi’s devotion to her. It must have taken half the night to dig a hole big enough for his 100 pound body to fit through and then another to reach his love.

I blocked access to the grave itself and made it so he could lay nearby but the next day when I was at work he ripped the back porch steps off and tunneled under the house toward the grave. He spend days under there and rarely came out. Eventually he stopped trying to get to Tyra but he grew more and more skittish and depressed as the days passed. Grieving is an important process and we wanted to honor his pain while helping him cope but it was hard as he didn’t allow us to comfort him. We brought his favorite dog friends to play each day and for a while he would seem joyful and carefree but afterwards he would go into a depression again.

We tried medication and herbal remedies to help him but didn’t see much improvement. People suggested getting him a puppy but we have endless puppies. We are a rescue and it’s rare that we don’t have puppies here to play with along with half a dozen or more dogs in need. Malachi loves other dogs but just as we cannot just replace a loved one, neither can Malachi. He has lots of playmates but Tyra was more of a mother figure, leader and teacher all in one and Malachi worshipped her like no other.

As time goes on Malachi seems to be happier again although like the rest of us it’s up and down. At times Malachi seeks attention and cuddles close as I massage him from his face all the way down to his tail and other times I can’t get anywhere near, let alone touch him. A friend reminds me to be more like Tyra in my interaction with him. Tyra wouldn’t have felt sorry for him, or herself. Tyra would have led him firmly and gently guided him through the pain. I’m hopeful that, with time, I will be able to take a role similar to Tyra’s in Malachi’s life. 

News: Guest Posts
How to Pet-Proof Your Garden

Having a pet that enjoys spending time in the garden requires a two-pronged security strategy: on the one hand, the garden needs protecting from the pet, but your pet will also need to be protected from the garden. Some plants and fertilizers, for example, can be poisonous – with the latter, it’s best to check the label, but also to cross-reference the contents online. In general, organic fertilizers such as manure, compost, or seaweed are safer, non-toxic options. See this nifty infographic for more dog proofing garden tips.


How to Pet-Proof Your Garden – An infographic by HomeAdvisor

 

News: Guest Posts
5 Ways to Keep Your Dog Safe During Fireworks

With so many dogs terrified of fireworks, 4th of July can be a frightening time for pups everywhere. In fact, July 5th is often the busiest day of the year at animal shelters, as pets run off from home in fear, found lost and confused the next day.

We’ve created this handy infographic to help owners keep their dogs safe during 4th of July fireworks (these tips apply to New Years fireworks and any other situations involving fireworks as well).

Share this infographic to spread the word and keep canines safe this 4th!

 

News: JoAnna Lou
Why Were 24 Bomb Sniffing Dogs Killed?
Suspicion surrounds a company who euthanized highly trained working pups in Kuwait.
Earlier this month, 24 bomb-sniffing civilian working dogs (CWDs) were euthanized by Eastern Securities, an American-owned company that provides explosives detection services in Kuwait. No one knows exactly why these highly trained pups were killed. Some say they were sick, while others say it was done because of a cancelled contract, or even out of revenge.

A former employee believes it was a result of Kuwait National Petroleum Company terminating their contract with Eastern Securities, which was being paid about $9.900 per month for each dog to detect explosives at oil drilling sites. Allegedly the contract was cancelled because the dogs failed to pass explosives detection tests. Another former employee believes that the dog's abilities declined over time because they weren't cared for properly.

Eastern Securities claims this is all the result of a conspiracy against them, but at least one U.S. based bomb-sniffing dog company stopped doing business with Eastern States years ago because they were "so terrible."

Esmail Al Misri, a local lawyer and animal activist, has another theory. She believes that the dogs were killed to punish 29 handlers who filed complaints with the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor because they hadn't received a paycheck from Eastern Securities since April. Esmail has asked local police to investigate the killings and press criminal charges. She's also concerned about the 90 bomb-sniffing dogs that are still at Eastern Securities.

Amy Swope, one of the former employees, has started a petition asking for the U.S. Embassy to step in and save these pups. She believes that signing the petition, getting media attention, and putting pressure on our government and the Kuwaiti government is the best way to get results.

No matter what the reason, dogs aren't tools you can just throw away when they're no longer useful. These animals gave their lives to serving people, and it is up to us to protect them.

News: Karen B. London
Cat Burglar Dogs
What has your dog broken into?

Some dogs would make excellent cat burglars. They seem to be able to break into anything. Secure trash can? Not so secure actually. Treats high up on top of the fridge? Not high enough to be out of reach. Storage bin that you can’t open without tools? Some dogs have all the tools they need inside their heads and mouths.

There are dogs capable of climbing to seemingly inaccessible spots, and dogs who can have a snack whenever they want just by opening up their dog proof food canister. Here is a video of one methodical dog patiently working out how to pull the top off a container of food.

Don’t even get me started about the dogs who actually open the fridge! If it weren’t for YouTube, I would have no idea that this is so common. Over the years, I’ve had a few clients tell me about dogs who do this, but if you look at videos online, you can find tons of examples. This collection of fridge-opening dogs features individuals using paws, noses and mouths to get inside and help themselves to the treasures within.

Dogs who can break into supposedly secure places to get what they want are probably quite happy and find many aspects of their world exceedingly convenient. What has your dog broken into that was supposed to be off limits to dogs?

News: JoAnna Lou
Tennis Ball Bombs
Innocuous looking explosives increase around the Fourth of July.






















My Border Collie, Scuttle, is obsessed with tennis balls. So when I found out that people turn these fuzzy yellow toys into homemade firecrackers, I was horrified. Even worse, abandoned ball bombs have been found undetonated, ready to explode.

In 2000, a man in Portland, Oregon found one while walking his pup. Thinking it was a ball, he threw it and the ball ended up exploding in the dog's mouth. The injuries sustained were so serious, the pup had to be euthanized on the spot. And just last year an Everett, Washington man found one during a hiking in Silver Lake Park, so these balls are not confined to urban areas.

Most of the official reports seem to be on the west coast, but it's relatively easy for anyone to make one, so they could turn up anywhere. Police all over the country are issuing warnings to watch out for these explosives, which become even more prevalent around the Fourth of July holiday.

It's important to be vigilant and avoid touching any stray tennis ball. If you see one, warning signs include detectable seams where the ball has been cut open, something sticking out of the ball that could be used as a fuse, or a small hole where the fuse used to be.

It's unfortunate and scary that we have to worry about these things. Stay safe this holiday weekend!

News: Editors
Weiner-Dog Spoiler Alert!

Todd Solondz’s new film is titled Weiner-Dog and is classified as a comedy. The director has a unique brand of filmmaking—he’s known for creating off-beat, dark character studies that stretch the boundaries of satire and humor. Many critics champion his work (Welcome to the Dollhouse, Storytelling) while others find them cruel and over-the-top downbeat. It’s not for nothing that he’s been called the “King of Feel-Bad Cinema.” Still, his films are serious and thought-provoking, grappling with life’s most difficult issues—alienation, human frailty, mortality. I was interested to see what he would do with a film centered around a dog.

If you intend to see this film, warning … read no further. The dog does not come to a happy end. And it is not off-camera. The gruesome hit-and-run scene seems to be inspired by Sam Peckinpah, the ’70s filmmaker noted for his ballet-like depictions of death scenes (The Wild Bunch). This cringe-worthy moment is one of many that animal lovers will suffer through. There are several other scenes of antiquated dog “training” and “care” that made viewers wince. Real as they may be, it’s hard to watch. That’s not to say that all film featuring animals must be obligated to end happily. We know that is not how life is. In an interview, Solondz talked with Gawker about the film’s subject matter:

“It’s very complicated in some sense that if you have a pet, a dog, it can be a vessel that one fills with one’s illusions or yearnings or hopes and so forth. That oftentimes has very little to do with the actual dog itself. It’s hard to see a dog in its own dogness. We’re so anthropocentric, it’s hard not to anthropomorphize. I think that when people see an animal harmed, it’s something that’s emblematic of the purity of innocence. Nothing can rival a little dachshund in its cuteness, and in fact, as you are probably aware, people have a harder time with that than harm befalling humans.”

Still, with all of the publicity surrounding the film (reviews in the New Yorker, on NPR) and misleading blurbs portraying the film as a comedy—we feel our readers should be forewarned. This is not a film for the faint of heart and certainly not suitable viewing for children. But don’t take our word for it, check out this review and others, and decide for yourself.

News: Karen B. London
How Does Your Dog Relate to Other Animals?
Friends Across Species

Dogs and people are truly the best of friends, but that doesn’t mean that dogs can’t be buddies with other animals, too. Though dogs and cats are often considered natural enemies, countless households have a dog and a cat who very close. They play together, sleep together and generally prefer to be near one another.

Less common, but still far from rare, are the dogs who have strong social connections to other species. I have one client whose dog loves to head upstairs in their apartment complex to hang out with the neighbor’s rabbit. A friend of mine has a ferret who plays daily with her dog until they are both exhausted.

Dogs and pot-bellied pigs can be great chums, and countless canines love spending time with their horse pals. There are plenty of dogs whose friends include sheep and goats.

I know of a couple of parrots and parakeets who socialize with dogs, and one pair of these vocalize together with great regularity. I’m not going to lie—the howling dog and the screaming bird don’t sound pleasant to me, but they seem quite happy with their symphony, and that’s what matters.

If your dog has a friend outside the dog or human species, how do they interact?

News: Editors
Saving a Stray Dog

One doesn’t often get the chance to have a hand in saving the life of another individual but early yesterday morning I had the rare opportunity to experience exactly that. A few days before, I and my pal, Naomi, were out walking our dogs at the Albany Bulb when we spotted a stray dog. The Bulb is a very unusual park constructed as landfill in the bay with debris from a previous highway. For years it was regarded as semi-marginal land full of mammoth chunks of concrete spiked with rebar tentacles but it became the favorite haunt for homeless encampments and outsider artworks, and, oh yes, for dog people too.

Recently the Bulb has received more attention from park planners, and is in the process of an intense clean-up and gentrification effort, some of it good, some of it threatening to become restrictive to our dogs. But it is still a wild and wonderful urban park with stunning views of the Golden Gate bridge. This past Saturday morning that is where my dog Lola found the dog at the end of what is referred to as the Bulb’s neck. It was only a fleeting image, of a white/brown fluff who yapped at Lola but as soon as we humans came on the scene, ran away. The next day we saw the dog at the same time and place but after a few barks, she sped off. We asked other park goers if they had seen such a dog and yes many had seen this dog for a very long time but didn’t know much more nor do much about it.

Obviously this was a dog who needed help, one can’t imagine where a dog could find any food and with no fresh water anywhere nearby, it seemed that she was in an extremely perilous situation calling for immediate intervention. So I contacted another friend, dog park advocate, Mary Barnsdale who, among many other dog-related interests, chairs an organization called Aldog, and maintains its Facebook page. I also asked her to also contact Jill Posener, another dog advocate and rescue person who runs a spay/neuter initiative called Paw Fund, who I knew has orchestrated successful stray rescues. They both had heard about this dog for at least four months, but the sightings were in many different areas that this was the first time they heard of sightings that were more precise and detailed. After our weekend initial sightings, my partner, Cameron, went out on day three, and he too found the dog in the same area. So now we now had a trifecta that could launch a rescue plan.

To further help the effort, Cameron put bowls of water, and tiny feeding stations throughout that area, and placed small irrigation flags to highlight the area. So on Tuesday evening Mary and Jill brought out the two traps, baited them and waited for a few hours. Nothing happened that night or the next, so it was decided that since we had seen the dog early in the morning, that the vigil on Thursday would be moved up to the crack of dawn.

Jill arrived first and had already baited the traps when I showed up at 5:30 a.m. She was standing off to the side of a pathway far from the traps to not be seen by the dog. She and I stood there whispering about the strategy, and at around 6:00 I saw a white flash go to the copse of trees where one of the traps was located. So we had our sighting. Jill told me that we might hear the trap door close but also cautioned that if the dog didn’t enter the trap within a few minutes that it would be it for that day. If that didn’t work then, we would have to remove the bait and plan to return the next morning and then scatter food around (and in) the trap to get the dog used to finding the food nearby. We waited with bated breath but did not hear anything, no barking, no cage door closing. But at 6:15 we quietly went out, not expecting to see anything but empty crates, but lo and behold, Jill quickly exclaimed, “bingo, we got a dog!” And there was the little wild one inside the trap, all the food had been eaten and when as we approached she barked up a storm and tried to dig her way out. It is really hard to express what a joyous moment this was but we took it very cautiously not coming too close, but close enough to see that she was safe and secure.

Jill then phoned Officer Justin Kurland of the Albany police department, who the day before had sent her this photo of the dog that he had taken at the exact spot where we were standing. He had seen the traps with a notice with Jill’s contact info. He had told her that if the trapping worked to call him and he would open the gate to the trail so she could drive up to the area instead of carrying the heavy crate down to the parking lot. So I was left alone to watch over the pup who I tried my best to reassure and cheer up, as Jill went to wait for him and to get her van. Even though the pup continued to bark, her body language seemed to calm down and she wasn’t frantic, there was even a slight tail wag. A few minutes later I was happy to see Officer Justin on a motorcycle escorting Jill’s van up to the rescue site. It was great getting his help, and he told us that he had two small dogs and might even adopt this one! We all were cooing and marveling at her. She sure is a cutie. He helped carry the traps to the van. He also added that he was so excited to get Jill’s call, that he left his cellphone at the station!

Once in the van, the dog totally calmed down, the barking stopped and she eagerly gobbled up the greasy chicken given to her between the bars, and even licked our fingers. It was like she was seemed relieved to get the wild life behind her. She didn’t appear too frightened, perhaps a little bewildered, but who wouldn’t be? We all fell under her spell.

Jill then drove her to the Berkeley animal shelter to see if she was chipped (negative) and check up on her health etc. She seemed fine considering her long ordeal, a few fur mats, but so far so good. They thought that with her nice white teeth that she was perhaps two years old (almost a quarter of her life spent as a stray). A vet will be checking her out thoroughly on Friday. So look like a Lhasa mix, with short legs and a lovely fluffy tail indicating a breed like that. Cameron and I paid a couple of visits to her today and we got to see a totally different dog as she greeted us at her kennel’s glass door. We weren’t permitted yet to go into her kennel, but Jill has the authority to do that, and it was so heartwarming to see how she was greeted by little Allie (with her new name) playing and nuzzling her. Jill will act as the adoption agent, finding her a foster home first and then picking the perfect forever guardian for her. Officer Justin might be just the candidate, and I heard that he has planned to bring his wife to meet with her. I am confident that all will work out for Allie, and I will be posting future news about her. But if anyone in the SF Bay area might be interested, you can contact me directly.

I can’t say enough about the great work that Jill and Mary do by picking up the slack from local shelters that are too strapped for staffing and funding—they simply do not have the resources to mount trapping efforts. This one was resolved quickly but normally it can take many days or even weeks and someone must be on site to check the traps so that other animals or dogs aren’t being caught. But individuals, like Jill and Mary, who freely donate their time and expertise, can also enlist others, such as eager ride-along novices like myself, to pitch in too. So this one worked out almost effortlessly, a full community effort, even involving a police officer!

I would love to hear your stray rescue stories. How were they resolved? Any tips to offer to others? Jill did teach me, that calmness and patience are key, but the payoff when a dog is safely rescued pays dividends that are definitely worth it all.

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