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News: Guest Posts
A Goth Pet

Prowling around the Internet is a little like wandering through a used bookstore -- lots of times I don't find what I'm after but I still go home with a few goodies. Like today, I was searching for some information on leashes and stumbled onto this eye-opening story about a British teenager who lives as a pet. Watching my pups snoozing in the October sun, I thought, I can relate to the dream of embracing a dog's life. That is, until canine-wannabe Tasha Maltby told a reporter she doesn't go anywhere without her fiance at the other end of the leash.

News: Guest Posts
Poop Patrol Demands Dog DNA

The world has totally gone to the dogs ... and CSI! In a suburb of Tel Aviv, Israel, dog lovers are eligible for rewards if they scoop the poop. I have two questions: 1) who has the fun job of collecting and testing the properly bagged and tossed poop, and 2) is it really necessary to reward someone for responsible behavior? I'm all for positive reinforcement, but I hate to think that people will only do the right thing because of a "what's in it for me?" mindset.

Dog's Life: Travel
A Dog Abroad
Getting from point A to point B sometimes requires thinking outside the airline cargo hold.
The author with her dog, Captain, and Oliver, the Kennel master; Captain on deck; Evening view sans dog

Dogs are part of the family, but are rarely treated as such by the travel industry. It’s easy to buy airline tickets for children, or make a hotel reservation that includes them. But as I discovered, dogs are another story. When I found out we were being transferred from the U.S. to Germany, one of my first thoughts was, “What about the dog?” The company transferring us was gracious about it; they agreed to cover travel costs for Captain, our eight-month-old, mixed-breed pup, but booking the travel was up to me.

I started by talking to airlines, and quickly found out that none would allow Captain—who weighed more than 20 pounds and wouldn’t fit under a seat—to fly in the cabin; he would have to ride in the cargo hold. Initially, I was told that for an extra $200, he could go as baggage on the flight on which we were ticketed. But when the airline found out that he was young and still growing, the terms changed: if he weighed more than 50 pounds on the day of the flight, he would be designated as cargo, and the cost could be as much as $2,500. And they couldn’t guarantee that he would be on the same flight as we were.

Since he was already 47 pounds, I figured chances were good he would fall into the cargo category. When I asked what would happen if he didn’t make our flight, the representative said that we could either change our flight (and pay the associated costs) or designate someone to pick up Captain, take him home and bring him back later to try again. Neither option sounded particularly appealing. And even though the cost wasn’t coming out of my pocket, it seemed excessive.

Persevering in my search, I called other cargo handlers. Lufthansa was the only airline that would transport dogs during the summer (which was when we were scheduled to move). Liability concerns have discouraged many airlines from transporting live animals at all; others will not fly them from May to September. Those I spoke with at Lufthansa were all very reassuring. They told me that dogs were held in air-conditioned areas and taken to the plane after all other baggage has been loaded, so they’re not left waiting on the tarmac. Food is not allowed in the crates, but they do allow water bottles, blankets or toys.

Even with the reassurances, I was still uneasy. I would need to have Captain in the crate and checked in three hours prior to flight time, and he would not be taken out of the crate until he had cleared customs at the end of the flight, which could easily be 14 to 16 hours later. In the meantime, he would be alone and buffeted by many unfamiliar noises and sensations. One airline representative told me that “to dogs, it is just like riding in a car,” but I didn’t quite believe that. I was worried, but didn’t see any options.

But were there other options? Imagine my surprise when I learned that the Cunard Line’s flagship ocean liner, Queen Mary 2, had kennel service on their monthly transatlantic cruise. I was further (and pleasantly) surprised to learn that fares for human passengers started at a level comparable to the cost of a round-trip transatlantic flight, and was considerably less than a one-way air ticket. While dogs (with the exception of service animals) were not allowed in the staterooms, the kennel area included a large playroom, and there was a deck galley for outside walks. Owners could visit several times a day, and a kennel master was on duty as well to care for the dogs at other times or if the owners were unavailable. Kennel fees started at $500. This sounded like it would be a much more pleasant experience for everyone, including Captain. After a short consideration, I booked our tickets.

Ready, Set, Go!

Fortunately, dogs traveling to EU countries, including Great Britain, no longer have to be quarantined. Owners need to make sure their animals have ISO chips for identification, a current rabies vaccination at time of sailing (at least 21 days prior), tapeworm treatment 120 to 24 hours prior to sailing, a thorough vet examination and a stamped sign-off by the USDA within 10 days of sailing. The paperwork, which sounds daunting, is required regardless of means of transport. Cunard made the process very easy, providing detailed checklists and pre-inspection of paperwork a few days prior to boarding so there was time to correct any missing information prior to our sail date.

I had been advised by our state USDA office to fax all paperwork from the vet’s office before coming into office for the stamps. The paperwork is complicated, and many vets do not do it frequently. In our case, some documentation needed to be corrected, and being on-site at the vet’s office made it easier to do. Since we’d cleared the paperwork in advance, obtaining the stamps was just a formality. Finally, papers in hand, we set out for New York City to board our ship.

After taking a few days to drive up the East Coast, visiting with friends and family along the way, we arrived in Brooklyn the day before sailing. We found a dog-friendly hotel close to the docks and spent the afternoon exploring the local city parks and sidewalks.

The next day, we arrived at the docks at the designated time. My husband saw us off, but he was not sailing with us, and I was concerned about handling both Captain and the baggage; since we were moving, I had 18 bags. Thankfully, curbside valets unloaded the car and whisked the bags away to be delivered to my stateroom, leaving me free to concentrate on getting Captain onboard and settled.

There were, of course, the lines and security that everyone has come to expect, but they moved quickly, and Captain took it all in stride. After the initial check in, I was sent to wait in a special area with the other dogs and their owners. There was a bit of barking as the 10 dogs who were making the crossing sized up one another, but no aggression, and the cruise line provided us with enough space to spread out.

After one of the pursers reviewed the EU paperwork and scanned the dogs to confirm microchip numbers, the kennel master, Oliver, boarded the dogs in groups of two. Quickly sizing up the group, he decided to take our 55-pound puppy on board first, along with two dogs I had named “the pretties”: sweet, docile Shih Tzus ensconced in their own carrier. Before he did anything, however, Oliver took a moment with each dog, introducing himself and letting them start to become familiar with him.

Guided by Oliver, Captain and I went up the gangplank and into the Art Deco opulence of the QM2’s Grand Lobby. Oliver kept us moving at a trot as we made our way through the ship and up to deck 12, where the kennels are located. Entering a side deck area through a gate labeled “owners only,” we came to the main kennel entrance.

There were two rows of kennel cages, six on the bottom and six on the top. The cages were separated by removable dividers, and Captain’s age and weight had earned him a double space on the bottom row. One would have given him plenty of room, but since he was still a growing puppy when I made the reservation, the staff erred on the side of caution (no one was sure how much he was going to grow before we sailed). Each cage was labeled with the dog’s name and outfitted with a thick blanket, dog bed, and food and water dishes.

We explored the room for a few minutes, then Oliver asked me to get Captain into his accommodations so he could continue the boarding process. I put a few toys in the cage and Captain hopped right in. When all the dogs were situated, we were given the visiting schedule, which allowed for about eight hours of interaction daily, and asked to come back later that afternoon, after the life-boat drills had been completed. As we sailed out of the harbor, the view from the top deck was magnificent, and everyone was excited. After months of planning and gathering paperwork, we were underway!

Life on Board

After a day or two on the ship, the dogs settled into a routine. They did their business on the deck, which was difficult for dogs who had been taught not to go on hard surfaces. There was a square of artificial turf, but initially, it confused them; they could tell it wasn’t grass. But eventually, need won out, and the dogs voided on the deck—a few rounds of treats and praise helped overcome their reluctance. Each established a favorite spot. Oliver, who was always there with a scooper, hose and squeegee, protested when the owners tried to help.

Cunard had stocked each dog’s favorite food, and many of us had brought along food and treats as well. Still, at first, some of the dogs weren’t interested in eating; Captain was one of them. Though he turned up his nose at his usual kibble, he was quickly won over when Oliver mixed it with some canned food he had on hand. For dogs who held out a bit longer than Captain, the kitchen sent up poached chicken, ground beef and rice. No dog refused that meal!

The dogs were a big attraction, and many passengers stopped at the fenced-off area to ask questions and watch the dogs. There were a few celebrities sailing with us, and they also found their way to the kennels; when he heard another Captain was on board, the QM2’s captain even stopped in to meet him. And of course, those of us whose dogs were the focus of so much attention spent many hours together each day, playing with our dogs and watching them play with each other. The dogs formed friendships, as did we. With the exception of one couple who traveled between homes in Great Britain and the U.S., everyone else was relocating, and like me, had not been comfortable transporting their dogs on airplanes.

We had all wondered how everyone would get along, but we were lucky—we were a group of down-to-earth, flexible, considerate people with reasonably well-behaved and friendly dogs. Oliver told us that most groups did get along well, but if there were problems, it was generally between the owners, not the dogs. He also said there was a conflict-resolution policy in place in the event things didn’t go quite so smoothly, which was reassuring.

Land Ho

We arrived in England at Southampton after a week at sea, which is where most of the dogs and owners left us. Only three dogs—Captain included—were continuing on to Hamburg. A vet boarded the ship to scan microchips and inspect the paperwork of the dogs disembarking. Captain stayed on board and played with Oliver while I took advantage of a shore excursion to Stonehenge.

With just three dogs in residence, the next few days were quiet, and after more than a week at sea, we were all anxious to get back on land. The dogs seemed to miss their friends, or perhaps were just exhausted after a week of playing, and spent most of the remaining time lazing in the sun.

The night before we reached Hamburg, we received word that the German vet had opted not to come on board, but rather, had reviewed and approved the immigration paperwork for the dogs via fax. In another nice surprise, we were told that the dogs entitled us to priority disembarkation status. We agreed to meet with Oliver as a group at 8:30 in the morning, and to leave the ship together.

The next morning, we took a few minutes to let the dogs romp and say goodbye to Oliver, since we knew it would be busy once we left the ship. Oliver was already making name tags for the next set of four-pawed passengers, who would be coming onboard later that day—the new group included two cats. Once we gave any treats that remained to Oliver (we couldn’t take them with us into Germany), we were ready to go. Oliver took Captain and I dealt with a couple of pieces of luggage; the rest of my bags had been collected the night before and would be waiting for me on the other side of customs. Cunard had processed passports while we were underway, so all I had to do was walk down the gangplank and show my passport to the agent on the dock. He nodded, and we were done.

Oliver walked with our group to collect our luggage, and handled all the dogs while we did so. It was now goodbye for real. With family members waiting to load us and our luggage into cars and take us to our new homes, we hugged, wished each other luck and told Oliver we hoped to see him on a future crossing. After this comfortable and well-orchestrated adventure, none of us could imagine a better way to cross the ocean with our dogs! 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Bark Survey Says ...
Readers Spend QT with Dogs

We were delighted to hear from thousands of you in our recent reader survey and the results paint a picture of devoted people who run with their big dogs.

Die-hard dog devotees, you typically spend about 3.5 hours of your day focused on your dog (though an impressive 22 percent ratcheted that all the way to 5+ hours!). A whopping 67 percent of you have medium or large dogs (dogs over 26 pounds) and 37 percent reported that your dogs are eight years or older. Sixteen percent of readers have pet insurance for their dogs, much higher than the national average of 4 percent. But the best number in the batch? Fifty-six percent of Bark readers stated that you adopted your dog(s) from a shelter or rescue, which is twice the national average. Bravo!

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Lost Dogs: How to Get Them Back
Important lessons from a decade of missing pet recovery

A few days into a family vacation in faraway Bora Bora, Lynn Janata got an unwelcome email from her dog sitter in Renton, Wash.: We have a situation here. Cali has gone missing. The 14-month-old Australian Shepherd had bolted through an open garage door. Although the sitter took quick action, each time Cali was spotted, she was farther and farther from home.

With the help of friends in the Seattle area, Janata contacted Jim Branson, a volunteer with Missing Pet Partnership (MPP), a local group that helps recover lost animals. Branson’s black Labrador, Kelsy, is trained in scent-detection for tracking other dogs. Several times, Branson and Kelsy found Cali’s scent, but they weren’t able to keep up. The dog crisscrossed a three-by-five-mile territory during her seven days on the lam.

Every morning, from the island in the South Pacific, Janata ran down Cali sightings. “People gave so much of their help to try to find our dog,” she says. “But Cali was freaked out; she wouldn’t come to anyone.”

When the family returned from their distracted vacation, they went directly from the airport to search for their dog. Janata headed to the intersection where Cali had last been sighted. And she saw her. “To me, it was a miracle — there she was, sleeping on somebody’s front porch,” she says. “But in the back of my mind, I’m hearing Jim say, She might even bolt from you.”

So Janata sat on the ground with her back to Cali and set out her favorite stuffed toy and treats. When Cali didn’t come forward, Janata lay on her back. That’s when the errant pup started sniffing the air. “Then she just broke into a run and jumped into my arms,” she says. “I started crying.”

Sitting with her back to Cali was hard for Janata. “I’m sure she wanted to run to her when she spotted Cali in that yard,” Branson says. “She may have wondered if my advice to lie on the pavement was the best way to catch a dog.”

He had been skeptical once himself. “I was like everyone else before I learned about this,” he says of the approach, which is based on calming signals developed by Turid Rugaas, a renowned Norwegian dog trainer. “Almost nobody knows about this before we tell them, and it’s everybody’s natural instinct, when they see a dog on the run, to chase it. That almost never works.”

This is just one of several critical truths gleaned by MPP during a decade in pet recovery and hundreds of searches for lost dogs and cats.

It Takes a Village to Find a Lost Pet
There is no precise figure for the number of companion animals lost every year. Estimates range widely between 2 and 5 million, according to Kat Albrecht, who founded MPP in 2001. The lack of reliable statistics is a measure of the issue’s low profile. Albrecht and her fellow searchers have been trying to improve these statistics for more than a decade.

We wrote about Albrecht in 2006, soon after she published her memoir, The Lost Pet Chronicles, which covered her transition from police-dog handler to pet detective (go to thebark.com/pet-detective to read the story online). At the time, she was a working pet detective in Fresno, Calif., focused on establishing a missing-pet recovery protocol and training lost-pet detection teams. Since then, she has moved her operation and shifted her focus. In 2008, she relocated to Federal Way, Wash., south of Seattle, where cooler, damper weather is better for training scent-detection dogs. She trained four new pet-search teams, of which Branson and Kelsy are the only active searchers.

Albrecht is, in general, moving away from training pet-tracking dogs. In part, unsavory pet detectives caused her change of heart. “Several people ended up claiming they had fully trained their dogs when they hadn’t,” and making promises they couldn’t keep, she says. Today, MPP volunteers help with local searches, including carrying out public alerts and deploying wildlife cameras and humane traps; they also provide sophisticated expertise, such as search dogs and magnet dogs (more on that later). They rent out equipment and ask for — but do not require — donations for consultations and scent-detection-dog services.

Albrecht’s current mission is to create training partnerships with animal shelters so they can deploy their own volunteers to help recover lost pets. MPP recently formed a partnership with the King County Animal Shelter in Kent, Wash., where they plan to launch the first-ever lost pet search-and-rescue team on July 1, 2011. Ultimately, they hope to take this training program to shelters nationwide.

Number One Lost Dog Recovery Method
In the intervening years, Albrecht has continued to search for lost pets and refine her techniques. Her biggest aha! moment since we joined her on a cat search in Fresno five years ago is probably what she calls the intersection alert, or intervention: volunteers hold neoncolored, poster-sized signs at a busy intersection near the animal’s escape point. “It’s pretty much a protest,” Albrecht says.

Take the case of a Chihuahua named Sukhi. Last year, she escaped on July 3. Her frantic owners contacted MPP on July 5, and five volunteers staked out the busiest intersection in Seattle’s Central District near Sukhi’s home, holding bright posters with Sukhi’s photo and CHIHUAHUA, RED COLLAR in large type. Within 20 minutes, someone driving through the intersection pulled over to say that Sukhi was at their house.

“The owners had put out hundreds of flyers prior to that, all of which had escaped the notice of this person, but these big signs are impossible to ignore, especially with someone there holding them,” Branson says. The “protest” creates a sense of urgency.

Intersection interventions are based on studies of “inattentional blindness,” which Albrecht read about in Temple Grandin’s book, Animals in Translation. “The hypothesis is that if you’re not paying attention to something, you won’t perceive it; it’s as if it’s not even there,” Albrecht says. The protests are designed to break through that blindness. (A related strategy is to tag a vehicle — providing the same key identifiers as on the posters — in neon ink on the back window.)

Even without staging protests, giant, bright, concise signs yield results — even weeks after old-fashioned 8-by-11 paper flyers have become rain-soaked, tattered and ineffective.

The approach for a missing dog is very different from that used to find a missing cat. Dogs run. Cats hide. To find a missing cat, you need a detailed search of your own and nearby properties. Wildlife cameras and humane traps are also helpful. To find a dog, “a search needs to be very visible,” Albrecht says. “Just massive, obnoxious marketing.”

Enduring Lesson: Persistence
When Branson lost his cat about 12 years ago, “We were told, as a lot of people are told today, ‘A coyote got your cat; there’s nothing you can do about it,’” he says. “It’s thinking like that that can prevent an animal from being found.”

Last October, for example, a cat named Burley hid in his own Sammamish, Wash., backyard for 33 days. It took persistence and encouragement, plus a motion-activated infrared wildlife camera and humane traps rented from MPP, to recover the cat.

“Having a resource like Missing Pet Partnership allows people to keep looking; it gives them tools [that help them] take active steps in the recovery of their animal rather than waiting and hoping,” Branson says. “Giving them encouragement [to look] increases the likelihood of a positive outcome.”

New Tool: Magnet Dogs
Over the past few years, Albrecht has pioneered a new technique for enticing reluctant pups: magnet dogs. The idea is to deploy a “wiggly, friendly dog” to attract a wary dog so he can be captured. It worked like a charm for a dog named Mack in November.

After escaping from their yard in Federal Way, Wash., Mack and his buddy Rocco, a pair of blue Pit Bulls, went missing for almost a month. Their owner, who was serving in Iraq, was devastated. When MPP volunteer Ryan Gamache learned about them, he made it his personal mission to recover the dogs.

Unfortunately, he discovered that Rocco had been killed and Mack had fled. But the bad news at least gave Gamache a starting point. He posted giant, neon posters that read “LOST BLUE PIT BULL BLUE COLLAR” along the major roadway near where Rocco had died. Immediately, leads came in.

Following up on a tip, he set out food and a wildlife camera, which caught images of the elusive missing dog. He then placed a humane trap near the camera, but for several days, the wary Pit Bull eluded capture. Then, a full week passed with no new photos. Gamache was discouraged, but not about to give up. (Remember, persistence!)

On January 26, he and two other MPP volunteers displayed new posters close to the last sighting. Leads flooded in the next morning. Around 11 am, MPP received fresh intel. This time, Albrecht wasn’t willing to run the risk of losing Mack. She headed to the scene with her magnet dog, Kody, a super-friendly Whippet mix. Through a variety of cell-phone machinations, Albrecht ended up just down the street from Mack, with Kody on a long leash.

“Mack immediately began to wag his tail, and walked right up to sniff noses with a tail-wiggling Kody,” Albrecht says. “My Snappy Snare was positioned over Kody’s nose so that when they sniffed noses, I could move it over Mack’s head, release the ring and catch Mack. It was a textbook capture!”

It’s also an illustration of a central philosophy of Missing Pet Partnership: try to think like the lost dog — in Mack’s case, like a dog who likes other dogs. It’s just one of many effective tools in a toolbox compiled over a decade of recovering lost pets.

Culture: DogPatch
Home Works: Cabin Fever
We’ve got the goods …

Mounted Custom Fishing Lure Boxes
Pay tribute to the dog who loves to go fishing with a custommade lure box featuring her name and photograph. Then select two other antique-style lure boxes for this classic mounted keepsake.

Vermont Branch Company Hooks
These natural birch hooks are ecologically harvested and available in various sizes.

Woodland Pet Placemat and Treat Jar
Easy-to-clean placemats add a touch of nature to your dog’s eating area while keeping food mess off the floor and this ceramic “tree” jar features a textured bark pattern; the silicon seal keeps treats forest-fresh.

Adirondack Pet Bed
This stylish and sturdy outdoor bed is made of hardwood and comes in two sizes (cushions sold separately); plus, the wide, flat arms are perfect chinrests!

Arthur Court Dog Bowl
While this handcrafted dog bowl isn’t itself nature-inspired, it’s helping to keep the natural world wild. A portion of each purchase funds the Arthur and Elena Court Nature Watch Conservancy, which supports wilderness protection organizations around the world.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
High Rise Pets
Pups very much at home in Texas tower

In mid-June, when the first owners moved into the Austonian, a 56-story luxury high-rise in Austin’s up-and-coming Second Street District, some of their welcome gift bags included biscuits from the Groovy Dog Bakery. This was just one of many gestures aimed at making new canine residents feel at home.

“Anybody who visits Austin can see from the get-go that it’s a pet-friendly city, and during development we considered the importance of embracing our future homeowners’ pets as an extension of the family,” says Austonian marketing director JoAnna Nuding, who, like everyone on the development team, has a dog. In her case, a 10-yearold black rescue Pug named Sadie.

“We asked ourselves, What is going to make someone want to bring a pet into an urban environment?” Nuding says. The answer: A 600-square-foot dog park on the 10th floor with selfdraining artificial turf; a fully loaded indoor grooming area where owners can DIY or arrange for in-building “spa” services with nearby Dirty Dog (one of several neighborhood pet businesses, including a vet and doggy daycare, partnering with the new establishment); a designated pet elevator; dog-loving staff primed to lend a hand including in-a-pinch walks, even at 3 am; and, importantly, no breed or size restrictions.

Offering amenities and services that go beyond the merely pet-friendly is the norm at many new high-end condos — from One Park Place in Kansas City to Sky Las Vegas on the Strip to the Residences at the Ritz Carlton in Toronto.

Why go so far for dogs? Luxury-minded empty nesters are downsizing, and “the mindset of the empty nester is the kids are gone but thank God I’ve still got my dog,” Austonian general manager Terry Arteburn says. “The dogs are now their children,” and for them, only the best will do. Ranging from $586,000 to $7.2 million and up, 40 percent of the Austonian’s 178 units were sold as of early summer.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Furever Homes: An Animal Rescue Board Game

Can a board game teach your kids about the animal rescue industry? Petsapalooza CEO Carianne Burnley designed Fur- Ever Home: The Animal Rescue Game to increase awareness of the challenges shelters face and dispel some myths about the animals who end up in rescue. Each player runs a shelter in Straytown, where they try to place cats and dogs in their “Fur-Ever Homes.”

Players face many of the same decisions and challenges real shelters deal with every day: hiring staff, fundraising, treating sick animals and overcrowding. Burnley says children who play the game are often surprised to learn that customers sometimes return the pets they’ve adopted. “It’s making children ask questions.”

Just like real shelters, Straytown shelters have a wide array of dogs and cats available. Although some pets are harder to adopt out because of their age, breed or behavior issues, there are plenty of puppies, kittens, purebreds and Canine Good Citizens. Burnley says, “I wanted to help people understand there are great dogs in rescue.”

For each game they sell, Petsapalooza is donating $5 to one of over 70 rescue organizations across the United States.

petsapalooza.com $29.99

Dog's Life: Travel
Essential Hiking Gear for You and Your Dog

This information has been adapted from Dan Nelson’s Best Hikes With Dogs: Western Washington, 2nd Ed.

Hiking is a great way to reconnect with both nature and your dog. On the hiking trail, away from cell phones and other distractions, you and your co-pilot can truly bond as you feel the terrain beneath your feet, take in the unfiltered beauty of nature and stop to smell the clover (or anything else that crosses your dog’s nose). But no hiker should venture far up a trail without being properly equipped. Outdoor experts Dan Nelson and The Mountaineers Books (publisher of the Best Hikes with Dogs series) offer their advice for safe and happy trails.

When heading out on a day (or multi-day) hike on a backcountry trail, the old tenet “be prepared” is to be taken seriously—starting with proper footwear, handy dog gear and basic safety measures. The items you pack will vary from trip to trip and dog to dog, but there are a few things each and every one of us should have in our packs. Each member of your hiking party—human or canine—should have a pack loaded with their Ten Essentials, including items you might need in an emergency.

Remember, the only way you can be sure your dog is safe on the trail, is if you stay safe, warm and well-fed. So let’s start with your essentials.

The Ten Essentials
1. Navigation (map and compass). Carry a topographic map of the area you plan to be in and know how to read it. Likewise, carry a compass—again, make sure you know how to use it.

2. Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen). In addition to sunglasses and sunscreen (SPF 15 or better), take along physical sun barriers, such as a wide-brimmed hat, a long-sleeved shirt and long pants. 3. Insulation (extra clothing). This means more clothing than you would wear during the worst weather of the planned outing. If you get injured or lost, you won’t be moving around generating heat, so you’ll need to be able to bundle up.

4. Illumination (flashlight/headlamp). If caught after dark, you’ll need a headlamp or flashlight to be able to follow the trail. If forced to spend the night, you’ll need it to set up emergency camp, gather wood and so on. Carry extra batteries and bulbs, too.

5. First aid supplies. Nothing elaborate needed—especially if you’re unfamiliar with how to use less-familiar items. Make sure you have plastic bandages, gauze bandages, some aspirin and other supplies recommended by the Red Cross. At minimum a Red Cross first aid training course is recommended. Better still, sign up for a Mountaineering-Oriented First Aid (MOFA) course if you’ll be spending a lot of time in the woods.

6. Fire (fire starter and matches). Campfires should be avoided in most backcountry camps, but they can be lifesavers in an emergency. An emergency campfire provides warmth, but it also has a calming effect on most people. Without one, the night can be cold, dark and intimidating. With one, the night is held at arm’s length. A candle or tube of fire-starting ribbon is essential for starting a fire with wet wood. And, of course, matches are important. You can’t start a fire without them. Pack them in a waterproof container and/or buy the waterproof/windproof variety. Book matches are useless in wind or wet weather, and disposable lighters are unreliable. Be sure to build an emergency fire in a safe location where the fire can’t spread.

7. Repair kit and tools (including a knife). A pocket knife is helpful; a multi-tool is better. You never know when you might need a small pair of pliers or scissors, both of which are commonly found on compact multi-tools. A basic repair kit includes a 20-foot length of nylon cord, a small roll of duct tape, some 1-inch webbing and extra webbing buckles (to fix broken pack straps), and a small tube of Super Glue.

8. Nutrition (extra food). Pack enough food so that you’ll have some left over after an uneventful trip—the extra food will keep you fed and fueled during an emergency.

9. Hydration (extra water). Figure what you’ll drink between water sources, and then add an extra liter. If you plan to rely on wilderness water sources, be sure to include some method of purification, whether a chemical additive, such as iodine, or a filtration device.

10. Emergency shelter. This can be as simple as a few extra-large garbage bags, or something more efficient, such as a reflective space blanket or tube tent. In addition to these essentials, I add an emergency survival kit. This tiny package at the bottom of my pack holds a small metal mirror, an emergency Mylar blanket, a whistle and a tiny signal smoke canister—all useful for signaling to search parties whether they are on the ground or in the air.

Here is a list of equally important essentials for your dog.

The Ten Canine Essentials
1. Obedience training. Before you set foot on a trail, make sure your dog is trained and can be trusted to behave when faced with other hikers, other dogs, wildlife and an assortment of strange scents and sights in the backcountry. If he can’t behave, don’t take him hiking.

2. Doggy backpack (for longer hikes). Let the dog carry his own gear. Dogs can be trained to carry gear in their backpacks, but, to avoid developmental problems, don’t put packs on dogs younger than a year old.

3. Basic first aid kit. The American Veterinary Medical Association recommends a checklist of items for your dog’s first aid kit. The Red Cross also offers classes in pet first aid.

4. Dog food and trail treats. You should pack more food than your dog normally consumes because he will be burning more calories than normal, and if you do end up having to spend an extra night out there, you need to keep the pup fed, too. Trail treats serve the same purpose for the dog as they do for you—quick energy and a pick-me-up during a strenuous day of hiking.

5. Water and water bowl. Don’t count on there being water along the trail for the dog. Pack enough extra water to meet all your dog’s drinking needs.

6. Leash and collar, or harness. Even if your dog is absolutely trained to voice command and stays at heel without a leash, sometimes leashes are required by law or just by common courtesy, so you should have one handy at all times.

7. Insect repellent. Be aware that some animals, and some people, have strong negative reactions to certain insect repellents. So, before leaving home, dab a little repellent on a patch of your dog’s fur to see your dog’s reaction to it. Look for signs of drowsiness, lethargy or nausea. Remember to restrict repellent applications to those places the dog can’t lick—the shoulders, the back of the neck, and around the ears (staying well clear of the ears and inner ears)—which are also near the most logical places mosquitoes will be looking for exposed skin (at the eyes, nose, and inner ears) to bite. And don’t forget to check your dog’s entire body for ticks, foxtails and other trail troublemakers after your hike.

8. ID tags and picture identification. Your dog should always wear ID tags, and since a dog lost in the woods can lose his or her collar, I’d heartily recommend microchipping her as well. Carry a photo of your dog in your pack. If your dog gets lost far from home, you can use the image to make flyers to post in the surrounding communities.

9. Dog booties. These help protect the dog’s feet from rough ground or harsh vegetation. They also keep bandages secure if the dog damages its pads.

10. Compact roll of plastic bags and trowel. You’ll need the bags to clean up after your dog on popular trails. When conditions warrant, you can use the trowel to take care of your dog’s waste. Just pretend you are a cat—dig a small hole six to eight inches deep in the forest duff, deposit the dog waste, and fill in the hole.

[The Mountaineers Books Best Hikes with Dogs series]

Dog's Life: DIY
DIY Home Ideas
Readers share tips

Double duty
When Dan and Amy Weinberg of Galloway, Ohio, couldn’t find a raised triple feeder that suited their tastes and their German Shepherds’ height, Dan made one to measure from a Corian countertop, then built and stained a hardwood base for it to rest on.
Outside, Dan looked at a log and saw a water-bowl holder. First, he carved a bowl-sized hole, then drilled through the log and anchored it to the ground with a piece of rebar. No more empty rolling bowls for the Weinberg dogs!

Potty Patio
Seasonal wind and rainstorms were making it hard for Stacie Holub of Gilbert, Ariz., to get her pup JD outside for bathroom breaks. With the help of her father, she assembled a shelter over the doggie door, giving JD some peace of mind when he does his business during a downpour. As a bonus, the patio also provides shade.

Mud be gone!
Diane Ward, her family and her Border Collies live on a sheep and horse farm in Whitefish, Mont., where winter snows are closely followed by prodigious amounts of mud in the spring. This inspired her to create a tiled indoor shower in her laundry area so she could hose off the dogs with warm water (and clean muddy boots as well).

Foiled again!
Rhetty, the high-jumping senior Golden mix, can’t leap this nifty six-foot-high gate, constructed by Annie Manchester of Lexington, S.C., from closet shelving material. She attached it to the inside of a hall closet with plastic brackets that allow it to be folded flat when not in use.

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