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News: Letters
Dogs on Deployment
Gaia

Gaia is my foster dog through Dogs on Deployment, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that provides a central database for military members to find families and individuals who are willing to board their pets while they are deployed. No pet should ever be surrendered due to a military commitment.

Dogs on Deployment exists to help military members keep their pets by reducing the need for pet relinquishment from military members due to the hardships of deployments. Military personnel are often deployed with two-weeks (or less) notice. This allows them little time to get everything together, including finding accommodations for their pets. They may be forced to give up their pets to shelters or put them on sites such as Craigslist.

I’m hoping to get a shameless plug for DoD with this cute photo of Gaia!

Culture: DogPatch
Paralympic Skier Dreams Gold
Danelle Umstead, Bettylynn, Rob Umstead

“Vision,” Danelle Umstead says, “is to have sight, an idea, or a dream.” Danelle’s immediate dream is to win gold for the U.S. in alpine skiing at the upcoming Paralympic Winter Games (March 7–16) at Sochi, Russia. Danelle teams with husband Rob Umstead who acts as her coach and sighted guide as they race through the courses. Rooting the couple on in Sochi will be Aziza, Danelle’s new guide dog. Danelle began working with Aziza this past summer, after her longtime guide dog Bettylynn (shown here with Danelle and Rob) was forced to retire due to optic nerve atrophy. Bettylynn will be pulling for the couple back at their home in Park City, Utah, with their son Brocton.

At the age of 13, Danelle was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa, a genetic eye condition where the retina progressively degenerates and eventually causes complete darkness. Her vision is “spotted” and she can only see up to three to five feet in front of her, and even then, only contrasting colors without any level of detail. In 2011 she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Still, none of these hurdles have kept Danelle from achieving her best.

Danelle was introduced to adaptive skiing by her father in 2000, who acted as her guide. She quickly fell in love with the sport—the freedom, the speed, the exhilaration. After she began training and working fulltime with Rob in 2008, competitive success soon followed with Paralympic Bronze medals in Vancouver, 2010, nine World Cup podiums and Paralympics Alpine Skiing National Championships. Her success relies heavily on trust and communication—100 percent trust in Rob as he guides her down the hill at top speed. It’s similar to the trust and communication that she had with BettyLynn and is working to build with Aziza. Danelle and Rob have created Vision4Gold.org as a vehicle to mentor junior disabled athletes by sharing her story and offering encouragement. We’re hopeful that Danelle realizes her vision in Sochi.

Update: Danelle has finished 5th and 4th in her first two Paralympic events at Sochi and hopes to climb the medal stand sometime in her next three races.

News: Guest Posts
App Review: Dog Decoder

Jill Breitner is a dog trainer with a mission: to make us aware of how dogs communicate by showing us how to “read” them. She developed her Dog Decoder app to do just that.

A helpful and handy primer on canine body language, it demonstrates the ways dogs let us know they’re scared, excited, cautious, willing and so forth. As Breitner explains, “If we understood what dogs try so hard to tell us, there would be fewer people bitten and fewer dogs ending up in shelters.” The app highlights 60 different poses/situations; each one (“butt sniff,” for example) comes with a helpful description that points out some common misconceptions, or the circumstances in which a dog will exhibit it.

A great tool for newbie dog people and those of us who need to brush up on dog talk. dogdecoder.com

Dog's Life: Humane
Bringing Calming Music to Shelter Dogs
Tuned In

Many of us have experienced this conundrum: We love animals and want to help them— especially our local shelter animals, many of whom experience trauma, confusion, pain and fear. And yet, the very thing that drives us to help—their suffering—can also be the thing that prevents us from actually going into the shelters to help. It’s hard to witness suffering, plain and simple. It’s hard to stand in the midst of such need and fear and sorrow and not fall apart. Suffering can make us feel helpless, which in turn makes us feel that we cannot help other helpless beings. And ’round and ’round it goes.

Two years ago, Pamela Fisher, DVM—a holistic veterinarian and founder of the Rescue Animal Mp3 Project, a nonprofit organization that distributes free music-loaded Mp3 players to animal shelters across the country— found herself in a similar situation. As she says, “I, along with many people, had trouble going into animal shelters. I wanted to help the animals [with Reiki and energy healing], but it tore at my heartstrings to see all those animals shaking at the back of their cages. And the barking can be deafening. I thought, there’s got to be a way I could help the animals feel better and be calmer. All I could think of was music.”

Dr. Fisher has used vibrationalhealing music—music specifically designed to not only promote relaxation in the animals and their human companions, but also, to help regulate the immune system—for years at her Ohio-based holistic veterinary practice. Thus, she has witnessed its benefits firsthand. These days, most of us are aware that science has proven that listening to specially calibrated music can help lower blood pressure, calm the nervous system, stabilize emotions and reduce anxiety. This applies to animals as well as humans; the animals who visit Dr. Fisher’s practice, even the vet-phobic ones, always become significantly more calm in the presence of the healing music.

One of the first vibrational healing CDs Dr. Fisher discovered was Healing Touch for Animals (Volume I). Composed by Carol Komitor and Inner Sound (Arden Wilken), this music is specifically designed to not only promote relaxation in the animals and their human companions; but to help regulate the immune system as well. “Of all the CDs I play at my office,” says Dr. Fisher, “I probably play this one the most. In fact, this is the one that helped inspire me to create the Mp3 project for shelters. At first, I figured I could donate some of this [Healing Touch for Animals] music to my local shelter. Then I found out that I was required to get permission to distribute all this copyrighted music. I figured if I was going to do all that work, I might as well try to find a way to distribute the music to all the shelters in the United States.”

Thus, the remarkable Rescue Animal Mp3 Project was born. Dr. Fisher began contacting musicians, sound healers and producers, asking them if they would be willing to donate the use of their music to this project. She focused animal-specific, sound-healing CDs. Most of the musicians Dr. Fisher contacted were thrilled at the idea of being able to help shelter animals. Eventually, she secured the rights to reproduce and distribute almost 30 hours of music.

The current Rescue Animal Mp3 is a “best of” compilation in animal sound healing therapy. Selections include tracks from Pet Calm and Pet Healing by Rick Collingwood, Canine Lullabies by Terry Woodford, Harp Music to Soothe the Savage Beast (gotta love that title) by Alianna Boone, Animal Angels and Connecting with Animals by Stuart Jones and Margrit Coates, Animal Healing and Music for Pets by Perry Wood and Margrit Coates, and the Healing Music for Animals and Their People (Healing Touch for Animals®) series mentioned above. (For a full list of music included on the Rescue Animal Mp3).

It took Dr. Fisher almost eight months to acquire the music and complete the necessary paperwork. Once that was accomplished, she went on to raise funds for the project and apply for grants so that she could purchase the Mp3 players and other necessary equipment. Finally, she loaded the players with the music and begin distributing them to shelters. When asked how many hours she put into the project in its preliminary stages, she says, “I won’t even venture to think about it. I work on it nonstop. My mission was to make it easy for the shelters. They don’t have the time or resources to acquire this music, so I did it for them.”

And when Dr. Fisher says easy, she means easy. All the shelters need to do is fill out an application. Project volunteers ship the pre-loaded Mp3 player at no cost, and provide easy installation instructions along with an FAQ page on their website. Typically, the shelter is required to provide its own amplification system (dock, CD player, speakers or computer), which most institutions already have in place. Sometimes, Fisher says, she donates speakers to shelters in need.

The response has been nothing short of remarkable. Survey responders consistently report that the music’s effect is overwhelmingly positive. Dogs have shown signs of reduced anxiety and anxiety-related behaviors such as barking, scratching, pacing and whining. Aggressive animals have mellowed out, traumatized dogs seem less fearful and storm-phobic dogs are noticeably calmer. Shelter workers have even noticed physical improvements in the form of increased appetites and more speedy recoveries from injuries and illness.

“Overall,” says Dr. Fisher, “the animals are better able to cope with the stress of shelter environments, and in turn, this improves their quality of life and increases their chance of acquiring forever homes. It’s part of a whole program. The Mp3 project is helping the animals get adopted.”

Currently, Rescue Animal Mp3s have been distributed to more than 800 shelters in 50 states, calming more than 87,000 animals. The Humane Society has endorsed the project, and the players are in use at such highprofile shelters as the New York CACC and the ASPCA. The project’s calming music can now be heard in animal sanctuaries as well; as of this writing, lions in Zimbabwe are listening to and benefiting from the music.

These statistics are remarkable, considering that the project—conceived and founded by one woman acting with one mission: to help animals— has been up and running for less than two years.

“The whole process of designing this project, starting a nonprofit, raising funds and applying for grants has been an interesting and difficult challenge for me,” Fisher admits. “But so rewarding for the animals’ sake.”

I hope you are as inspired by this woman and her project as I am. To find out more, donate or volunteer, visit rescueanimalmp3.org.

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Training Dog Trainers

Do you love dogs and ready for a change in your life? Are you interested in that encore career that you’ve long dreamt of—one where you combine your interest in dogs with learning and teaching?

More and more people are turning to online education to broaden their knowledge and learn new skills. Dog training is among the professions embracing online education, and none does so better than Karen Pryor Academy for Animal Training & Behavior (KPA).

KPA is an innovative institution committed to educating, certifying, and promoting the next generation of animal trainers. Students of all ages enroll in the Dog Trainer Professional program and graduate to become Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partners (CTPs).

Since launching KPA in 2007, Karen Pryor has added several new courses including an online beginner course, Dog Trainer Foundations. “We developed this course to give the average person a jump start on becoming a trainer,” she says. “But even if you aren’t looking to become a professional trainer, this course will help you understand the basics so you can apply it at home with your own pets. It is perfect for anyone who wants to learn more about training or just connect with your dog in a way you never have before.”

She also lauds the convenience of KPA and says its perfect for the average pet owner. “KPA maximizes your learning while minimizing the disruption to your life. Plus, you can continue working while you take your career to the next level.”

KPA courses are taken online with the exception of the Dog Trainer Professional program. That program has an online component in addition to hands-on workshops that take place in locations all around the country. The quality of education combined with the convenience of online learning is great for students who require some flexibility in order to participate in the program.

Successful candidates must complete the program, earning the equivalent of an “A” on each component of the assessment, and pledge to uphold the high standards and practices of Karen Pryor Academy. “Our graduates are not only skilled trainers, they are excellent teachers,” said Karen. “I’m proud to be able to welcome our graduates to the growing family of KPA-Certified dog trainers nationwide.”

For more information, visit www.karenpryoracademy.com. As a special offer, BARK readers can save $60 on the Dog Trainer Foundations course by entering the code KARENBARK.

News: Editors
Treasure Hound

Have you heard about the couple in Northern California who were out walking their dog on their property and stumbled upon the greatest treasure of rare gold coins ever found in the U.S? It was buried in eight old tin cans, under an old tree. It’s a great story and evidence that dog walking is definitely worth its weight in gold. The coins, all 1,427 of them, date from 1847 to 1894, the height of the Gold Rush, and have initially been appraised at being worth $10 million. One $20 gold coin, minted in 1866 before the slogan “In God We Trust” appeared on coins, is so rare that by itself could fetch $1 million. The couple, and their pooch, wisely wish to remain anonymous and have lived in this rural area of California’s Gold Country for several years. They did say that this treasure means that now they can keep their property, the man adding, “Like a lot of people lately, we’ve had some financial trials, I feel extreme gratitude that we can keep our beloved property.” The couple also noted that they want to donate some of the proceeds to the homeless and hungry in their area.

What treasures or special finds has your dog sniffed out?

For more news on this story.

News: Editors
A Puppy on her mind

Another great ad is launching at the Super Bowl, this one is from General Mills and reprises its multiracial family ad for Cheerios that stirred up a lot of intense and nasty hoopla online (as well as thumbs up opinions too) when it aired in May. Good for Cheerios that they are going with this family again, and it will mark a first appearance on Super Bowl Sunday for the company. And, no, there isn’t a dog in it, but there’s certainly a mentioned of a promised one. Little Gracie is a doll in how she raises the cheerios “poker” hand with her dad for a  “puppy” as her ante, but almost better is the expression on the mom’s face! What’s not to love about this?


Watch it!

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Crissy Field Dog Use in Peril
Speak Now or Forever Hold Your Leash

The San Francisco Bay Area is blessed with a majestic natural setting. Thanks to forwardthinking citizen activists and environmentalists, generations have been able to enjoy the scenic beauty and open spaces of Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo Counties.

In 1972, Congress established Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA)—a unit of the National Park Service—to, among other things, create an area that “concentrate[s] on serving the outdoor recreational needs of the people of the metropolitan area.”

For decades, these traditional “outdoor recreational needs” have included off-leash dog walking. In GGNRA’s San Francisco-based sites alone, off-leash areas (OLAs) from Crissy Field to Fort Funston occupy prime spots along the bay’s shoreline. Currently, a little less than 1 percent of all of GGNRA’s approximately 80,000 acres of protected lands are accessible for any kind of dog walking, and now even this small amount is in jeopardy.

In 1979, GGNRA adopted a Pet Policy that outlined off-leash rules and defined OLAs in its San Francisco and Marin County sites. However, over time, GGNRA began closing some of these off-leash areas and, in 2001, rescinded the 1979 policy. During this period, and throughout several subsequent legal challenges, howls of protest were heard across the region. Consequently, GGNRA stopped enforcing leash laws and began the long process of creating a special rule to manage dogs in its parklands.

In 2010, GGNRA released its draft dog-management plan, in which they proposed restricted alternatives in 22 areas. After roughly 4,700 people submitted comments regarding this deeply flawed document, GGNRA went back to the drawing board and recently released a supplemental plan.

Unfortunately, the new plan is just as restrictive, proposing extremely limited off-leash and on-leash areas, as well as no-dog areas, for historically dog-friendly Crissy Field, Muir Beach, Baker Beach, Mori Point and Rancho Corral de Tierra, among others.

In its attempts to balance off-leash dog recreation with other park uses, it appears that GGNRA is abusing its discretion by curtailing this use without adequate scientific support for the impacts they claim, and ignoring or discounting the demonstrated impact on existing recreational uses. The outcome of this final plan could have repercussions nationwide as policymakers watch to see what kinds of restrictions to dog-walking access the public will accept.

Crissy Field Dog Group supports a modified alternative to the 1979 Pet Policy that includes responsible offleash dog-walking in GGNRA lands (including those in San Mateo County), provides clear and concise signage and continuing-education opportunities such as fee-based off-leash training classes, allows each permitted professional dog walker to handle up to six dogs, and creates a monthly recreation roundtable so that different user groups can address visitor concerns.

We need you to become involved in this process. Please write to your elected officials and let them know what you want. The current deadline for public comment is December 4, but we have requested an extension.

If dogs are this severely restricted in GGNRA, city dog parks and neighborhoods bordering the parklands will be inundated with dog walkers, and there will likely be more conflict. Let’s create a dog-management plan that protects these scenic areas and allows everyone to enjoy them.

Details on the current proposal can be found at parkplanning.nps.gov/ dogplan. Go to crissyfielddog.org, eco-dog.org and saveoffleash.org for more information on the commenting process.

News: Karen B. London
Cigarettes and Beer as Reward for Lost Dog
It’s an unusual offer, but the dog is back

There’s a similarity among dog lovers in that we would give “anything” to get a lost dog back, but when it comes to being specific about what that means, we’re all different. Abigail Miller of Dayton, Ohio offered a pack of cigarettes and a case of beer for the return of her lost dog, Zoro.

Both of her dogs escaped through a gate in her yard, and though Miller found Ajna at a local shelter a few days later, Zoro was not there. After seeing Miller’s flier with its unusual reward, a man reported that he had seen a dog matching the description. His information led her to the house where Zoro had been taken and to a couple who had found and intended to keep him. Ten days after the escape, Zoro came back home to Miller’s.

The man who found Zoro declined the reward, so Miller plans to give him food from the restaurant where she works instead. When asked about the reward, Miller said that she could afford it and that she hoped it would be unusual enough to catch people’s attention.

Have you seen rewards offered for lost dogs that depart from the usual cash offerings?

News: Editors
Bark Fan Kaley Cuoco Marries!

We want to send special congratulations to one of our biggest fans—Kaley Cuoco. The “Big Bang Theory” star tied the knot with tennis pro, Ryan Sweeting on New Year’s Eve. No word yet if Kaley’s three dogs were in attendance but it wouldn’t surprise us if they were. The other great love of her life are dogs. Cuoco is a longtime animal advocate who tirelessly promotes rescue and adoption. Her rescued Pitbulls Norman, Loretta and Shirley aid in her efforts to rehabilitate the breed’s bad rap. A few years back, Kaley appeared in Men’s Health and was asked to list “4 Things I Want to See You Reading at the Beach”—she replied (for number 3) The Bark: I’m a huge dog lover—I have three—and I love this magazine. It has everything you need to know. I’m also big on rescuing dogs, so if you have a rescued dog sitting beside you while you’re reading The Bark , oh, forget it—I'll marry you right there!

Perhaps, Mr. Sweeting is a Bark reader too?! Best wishes Kaley and Ryan!

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