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Culture: Reviews
Book Review: The Last Walk
Reflections on Our Pets at the End of Their Lives

No one who lives with and loves a dog wants to think about the subject of this book. We know quite well that one day we’re going to have to face life without our dog’s physical presence … that, indeed, we will very likely have to make the decision that ends our dog’s life. Yet, denial runs deep. Not now, we think. Not yet.

Hard though it may be to do, however, read this book. In it, the author seamlessly weaves journal entries detailing the last year of her old dog Ody’s life with what science has to say about animal aging, end-of-life care and, ultimately, death. She engages both heart and mind in her quest to come to terms with Ody’s deteriorating condition, and to figure out how to best meet his needs. Above all, she’s driven to answer two questions: What does a “good death” look like? And, by extension, how can she ensure that Ody has one?

Impeccably researched, the book covers the biological, philosophical, cognitive and medical aspects of animal aging. Pierce, a bioethicist and (with Marc Bekoff) co-author of Wild Justice: The Moral Lives of Animals, has a gift for explaining scientific subjects to non-scientists.

Yes, you’ll cry. The bond Pierce has with Ody, and her commitment to honoring it, will touch your heart. Nonetheless, traveling with her on that “last walk” is the best way to prepare yourself for the time you’ll have to make it with your own dog.

It has been said that knowledge is power. In this book, the author has given dog lovers a powerful tool to help them navigate one of life’s most profound passages.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: The Business of Dog Walking

Ever think you might want to consider a career move? One that would take you out of an office setting and, even better, reward you for spending time with many dogs in the great outdoors? Professional dog walking might just be your next calling. In this informative new book by Veronica Boutelle, author of two other dog-business books and co-creator of the Dog Walking Academy, you’ll find a wealth of information to help you get started.

There is a thorough examination of not only what it takes but also, what to expect if you decide to venture into this business. Chapters cover topics such as pack management (with a cautionary note that it is always best to keep it small), client intake, marketing and emergency planning. The author, who seems to have covered all the bases, also includes a helpful “to-do list” for legalities and liabilities.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: Decoding Your Dog
Vet Experts Tell Us How

Did you know that the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) has fewer than 50 members? To obtain board certification in this specialty, each has gone beyond a DVM to earn various degrees in applied animal behavior, and has completed a rigorous training program as well.

Decoding Your Dog (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, January 2014), with sections on canine behavior written by 20 ACVB diplomates, thus represents the expertise of some of the leading experts in the field. Their goal is two-fold: to make sure dog people have scientifically correct information about dog behavior problems and “to correct widespread misinformation.” The volume is well edited by Drs. Debra Horwitz and John Ciribassi and pet journalist Steve Dale; Victoria Stilwell contributed the foreword.

A concerted effort to debunk the many fallacious, pseudoscientif ic notions all too prevalent in the dog world is really long overdue. This book repudiates, in each and every one of its 14 chapters, the theory of dominance— i.e., dogs want to be pack leaders—that has been promulgated for much too long. In “Creating a Mensa Dog,” Dr. Katherine Houpt outlines that theory: “It goes like this: since dogs are essentially domesticated wolves, and wolves have a rigid dominance hierarchy within their pack, the same must be true for dogs. Simple, right? But the thinking turns out to be wrong.” She then goes on to tell us why it is wrong. Similarly, when this concept appears in other chapters, it’s firmly dismissed as a myth with no scientific basis that harms dogs and our relationships with them.

Another adroitly debunked myth is that dogs feel guilty about infractions people find upsetting, such as house soiling. Dogs must know they’ve done something wrong, right? In “Can’t We Just Talk?” Dr. Jacqueline Neilson explains that while to us, cringing may look like guilt, what is actually happening is that dogs see us acting aggressively and do what they wisely do when faced by an angry bully: offer a submissive response. In the fascinating chapter on aggression, Drs. Ilana Reisner and Stefanie Schwartz remind us that dogs are not mean: “There is no revenge or malice in dogs; they are merely using canine tools to respond to social situations.” Also, that aggression is a response to many different triggers, some of which might not be apparent to us. Consequently, it’s imperative that we learn how to read canine body language and methods of communication. Punishment, they say, “is not necessary when you’re managing your dog’s behavior, and at worst is likely to increase anxiety and aggression.” That means no leash pops, alpha rolls or other “in your face” confrontational techniques (as used by a popular TV personality). It is up to us to defuse the situation, and then work on a strategy to fix the problem.

On less dire subjects, it’s good to know Book Reviews that there is no association between “spoiling,” such as allowing a dog to sleep on the bed, and behavior problems. And that dogs rely on “visual and olfactory cues for communication,” which means it’s best to train them with hand signals first, then supplement with verbal cues.

I found the chapter on separation anxiety by Drs. E’Lise Christensen and Karen Overall to be invaluable, particularly their reminder that “only when dogs are calm can they learn new things, including how to be home alone.” With information ranging from the best ways to start out with dogs to helping dogs as they age, this book is appropriate for both novice and seasoned dog people. The editors have done a good job in making the text readable and approachable; each chapter incorporates case studies, and there is a clear organizational format. Recurring sections (“Facts, Not Fiction,” “Is That Really True?”) and review summaries (“What Did We Say?”) neatly encapsulate the various messages. I have a little quibble with the use of the latter phrase, which sounds like a scolding parent’s “What did I tell you!” But that doesn’t detract from my overall admiration for this book. Decoding Your Dog is an important addition to the canine canon, one that will go a long way toward increasing your understanding of your best friend.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: The Dog Encyclopedia

This hefty compendium underscores the old saw about the value of pictures. Heavens, dogs are lovely, aren’t they? Flipping through the pages rewards the reader with information on more than 400 breeds, crossbreeds and “unknowns,” in all their sizes, shapes and colors—an exploration that speaks not only to the length of our association with dogs, but just how much we’ve influenced their development. Readers are introduced to many breeds not at all well-known in this country, including the pert little Kooikerhondje from the Netherlands and the Slovakian Rough-haired Pointer, a breed that, it is said, “thrives on company and activity.” Both of these breeds, and many others too, look like charming mixes, which is how “pure” breeds started, after all.

We also learn interesting facts about each breed. For example, the Lucas Terrier is a cross created by Sir Jocelyn Lucas, who—unhappy with the way his breed, the Sealyham, was being modified by show-ring standards—bravely decided “to outcross his dogs with a Norfolk Terrier” to add more vigor. Then there’s the New Zealand Huntaway, who “lacks a breed standard”; this mix of German Shepherd, Rottweiler and Border Collie makes for a very handsome dog.

Along with stunning photos, the book also has helpful “care and training” basics, which, luckily, employ positive techniques, as well as amazing illustrations of canine anatomy and interesting dog-culture coverage of canine evolution, art, lore and history. An engrossing and entertaining book for the whole family to savor.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: All that Ails You
Published by CreateSpace
All That Ails You

All that Ails You is narrated by Wrigley, a most attentive caregiver: emotionally attuned, good-natured, resilient—just what’s needed in an assisted-living facility. Sure, he’s a dog, but that’s a plus in an environment where it’s sometimes hard to remember that life was once joyful. As All that Ails You makes clear, dog power can be a perfect antidote to illness and loss.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: Dogtripping
Published by St. Martins
 dogtripping

Best known for his “Andy Carpenter” mystery series, Rosenfelt recounts a real-life adventure in this book, something those of us who fret over preparing for a weekend in the country with our dog will find truly daunting: moving 25 dogs across country, from California to Maine, in a caravan of RVs. With typical self-deprecating humor, Rosenfelt not only journals the move, he also shares how he and his wife got involved in rescue work, and the stories of some of the dogs they saved.

See our interview with author David Rosenfelt.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: Weekends with Daisy
Published by Gallery Books/S&S

Suffering from canine deficit disorder, Sharron Luttrell signed up to be a NEADS/ Prison Pup Partnership co-caretaker, the person who familiarizes an assistance-dog-in-training with daily life on the “outside.” In doing so, she learns to let go and to plumb the depths of her own compassion for the benefit of others.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: Following Atticus
Published by William Morrow

We review Tom Ryan's Following Atticus. Start with New Hampshire’s White Mountains, add a small dog and an overweight and out-of-shape reporter on a mission, and what do you get? A truly uplifting account of the adventure of a lifetime and a partnership built on mutual trust. A book of “life, growth and redemption.”

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: Short Leash
Published by Michigan State U Press
Short Leash Book Review

In Short Leash: A Memoir of Dog Walking and Deliverance, Pema Chodron has said that the best way to deal with fear is to lean into it, diffusing its effect by letting it inform you and staying present. Suffering the aftereffects of traumatizing attacks, Gary and her dog Barney leaned into their fears and in doing so, freed themselves from them. An inspiring and uncompromisingly honest story.

Culture: Reviews
Book Review: Ask Bob
Published by Henry Holt
Ask Bob

Before there were dog “love” stories, there was the irresistible The Cat Who Went to Paris. Peter Gethers is back with a charming novel about Bob, the type of vet we’d all love to have. There is also a cast of lovable and amusing characters, including a romantic interest who was a little too unyielding for my liking. The animals, both patients and those who are part of Bob’s family, are well drawn, and observations such as “Pet weight is one of the most delicious feelings in the whole world … it is like an extraordinary security blanket,” make Ask Bob a gem of a book.

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