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App Review: Dog Food Hazards
Quick access to list of foods our pups should avoid.

Although we're inundated with apps these days some information is worth carrying around with us for quick access. The newly released Dog: Food Hazards app (android, free) is a very simple app dedicated to one topic, as you might have guessed, hazardous foods dogs should avoid.

Featuring a simplified layout for quick navigation, one can refresh their knowledge of dangerous foods for dogs and get information on symptoms caused by each featured food type. As a bonus they’ve prominently placed access to ASPCA’s pet poison hotline so it is quickly accessible too.

Unfortunately, the list of food hazards is limited, so it may not be helpful for people looking to delve deeply into the topic. While Dog: Food Hazards is a fairly barebones app, we enjoy the peace of mind that comes with its ease of access to information that every dog owner should know.

News: JoAnna Lou
Study on Canine "Seat Belts"
CPS finds only one car restraint system that passes their tests

Keeping dogs safe in the car has long been a concern of mine. Previously I wrote about the crumple zone in the back of the car, which made me consider moving my pups to the safer back seat area using harnesses since I can't fit my crate in the passenger area. However, I was not impressed testing or lack of standards on car restraints, so I stuck with my crate (To be fair, crates don't have much testing either. There is only brand one on the market, Variocages, that is crash tested and designed with the crumple zone in mind, but they come with a hefty $1,000+ price tag!). 

The results of a new study on canine car restraints doesn't exactly boost my confidence in these "doggy seat belts." A study by the Center for Pet Safety (CPS) and Subaru found that only one of the eleven systems they tested provided adequate protection to the dog and passengers of the vehicle. 

CPS designed their crash test on the standard that is currently used to certify child safety seats. The testing occurred in two phases. First, each harness was subjected to a preliminary strength test. Only seven passed and continued to the crash test portion. The systems were tested using specially designed crash test dummy dogs in three sizes: a 25 pound Terrier mix, a 45 pound Border Collie, and a 75 pound Golden Retriever.  

Only one system passed all of the tests, the Sleepypod Clickit Utility, meaning the dog remained restrained during every test and offered protection to the passengers.

Klein Metal AllSafe, Cover Craft RuffRider Roadie, RC Pet Canine Friendly Crash Tested, Bergan Dog Auto Harness, Kurgo Tru-Fit Enhanced Strength, and IMMI PetBuckle did not have optimal performance.  Some allowed dogs to launch off of the seat or did not control the pet's rotation (something I wouldn't have even though about). The worst products, IMMI Pet Buckle, Kurgo, and Bergan, allowed the dog to become a full projectile or to be released from the restraint.

CPS plans to use the data from their study to help develop standards for performance and test protocols of restraint systems since there are currently no industry guidelines.

Founded in 2011, CPS is a registrered non-profit research and advocacy organization dedicated to companion animal safety. They are not affiliated with the pet product industry and do not endorse products. I can't wait to see what they have in store next!

News: Editors
Jason Collins, making waves
What's This Have to Do with Dogs?!

We’ve taken some criticism on Facebook for our post earlier this week on Jason Collins and his dog, Shadow. Some people have taken exception with our use of the word “courageous” in connection with Collins’ announcement that he is gay (a first for an active, professional male athlete). Others, have questioned “what does someone’s sexual preference have to do with dogs?” I wanted to take a moment and express The Bark’s curatorial perspective when posting content to Facebook and to our other social media channels. It has been our goal since we began publishing The Bark 16 years ago, to explore the world of dogs in as varied and expansive a manner as the topic itself. It not only includes the traditional subjects of health, science and the arts, but also how dogs touch nearly every aspect of our lives from social issues to cultural events, and increasingly, their presence in the media. We don’t claim to cover every worthy story on dogs, but we try to mention the ones that interest us, the stories we feel are important. This is why we wrote about Jason Collins. As one reader wrote “thanks for finding the humanity in a dog’s story … and the dog in a human story.” Collins himself expressed his revelation thus: “I didn’t set out to be the first openly gay athlete playing in a major American team sport. But since I am, I’m happy to start the conversation.”

The Bark is happy to engage in that conversation and others we deem meaningful, and we welcome your comments—both supportive and critical. We think that the diversity of ideas makes for a richer community.