Home
science
Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Dogs Vary in Size Within Breeds
How big is the range?

Last weekend, there was a chocolate Lab at the athletic fields where my husband and I were playing flag football with some other people, including his guardian. Both my children had a ball running around with Porter on the sidelines. He was very sweet and well trained. He played Frisbee, chased some of the adults around if they enticed him to do so, and got off the field and sat when asked to do so. He was energetic, but not overly aroused, let everybody pet him, and was generally a credit to his breed.

  He was also enormous. He weighs 105 pounds, and while nobody would describe him as svelte, he wasn’t overly fat as we regrettably know so many dogs in this country are. It’s hard to say, but I would guess that his perfect weight would be somewhere in the low 90s, which is still a large Lab. He was broadly built and unusually tall for his breed. His loping style of running made me wonder whether he had any Great Dane in him, but I was told he’s all Lab.   Lately, I have seen quite a few Labs who are pretty large, and yet I’ve also seen ones who are so small I suspect people often think they are adolescents who are yet to reach full height, event though they are 3-years-old, 5-years-old, or more—certainly full grown. I’ve seen dogs of other breeds who seem far from typical in size, including a Brittany who is 5 inches taller than all his littermates and an Airedale Terrier who was much closer in size to an average Irish Terrier.   I know that despite breed standards, what’s popular in terms of size varies over time. And sometimes, for whatever reason, dogs are born who don’t match the size typical in their lines. Coming from a family with women who range in height from 4’9” to 5’11”, I am very interested in diversity in size among relations.   Do you have a dog who is either unusually large or unusually small for the breed?

 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Nobel Laureate Konrad Lorenz
An ethologist who loved dogs

As this year’s Nobel Prizes were announced, I faced my annual wish for anyone interested in dog training and behavior to know that three scientists in the field of Ethology have been awarded this prize. In 1973, Niko Tinbergen (The Netherlands), Karl von Frisch (Austria) and Konrad Lorenz (Austria) were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their discoveries concerning organization and elicitation of individual and social behaviour patterns.” They are regarded as being among the founders of the field of Ethology, which is the study of animals in their natural habitat.

  While they are best known for their work with birds, insects and fish, all of them studied a variety of species. Konrad Lorenz was quite interested in dogs, and wrote a wonderful book called Man Meets Dog. One of the great contributions of this book to the study of animals concerns Lorenz’ interdisciplinary approach to understanding dogs. As Donald McCaig states in the introduction to a recent edition, “He made it respectable to bring the practical observations of animals trainers and handlers into the academy. It was a great first step, and although the gulf between academic study and practical applications remains with us today, Lorenz did much to merge what is known from different areas into a cohesive body of knowledge in order to further our understanding of animals.”   Some of my favorite aspects of this book are personal stories. For example, Lorenz describes the close relationship between his future brother-in-law, Peter, and a Newfoundland named Lord who joined the family when the dog was 1½ years old. Peter was the smallest of four brothers, and the youngest in a gang of boys who participated in their fair share of mischief. The dog protected him to such a degree that even his schoolmaster dared not raise his voice to Peter, lest he growl and leap up with his massive size on the shoulders. Naturally, this dog kept the other boys from teasing or bullying him as well.   Lorenz discusses his great sadness at losing dogs to old age. When he was 17, his dog Bully died of a stroke and he describes his sadness that the dog had left no offspring. For a long time after Bully’s death, Lorenz says he heard the pattering of Bully’s peculiar gait following after him as he had done for so many years in life. He writes, “If I listened consciously, the trotting and snuffling ceased at once, but as soon as my thoughts began to wander again I seemed to hear them once more.” Only when his new puppy Tito began to run behind him and follow him everywhere did the “ghost” of Bully cease to follow him in his mind.   Years later when Tito died, Lorenz felt a great guilt knowing that another dog would take the place of Tito just as Tito had replaced Bully in his heart. He says he felt ashamed of his own unfaithfulness and decided that for the rest of his life, only descendents of Tito would be his companions.   Besides being a brilliant scientist, Lorenz is an excellent writer whose words are equally effective when he is discussing scientific principles as when he muses on the transience of life: “In human life there is enough suffering—of which everybody gets his share—when we come to take leave of someone we love, and when we see the end approaching, inevitably predestined by the fact that he was born a few decades earlier than ourselves, we may well ask ourselves whether we do right to hang our hearts on a creature that will be overtaken by senility and death before a human being, born on exactly the same day, has even passed his childhood.”
Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Heartworm Superbug?
Should we be worried about resistance

Heartworm disease is a horrible and potentially deadly disease that is fortunately preventable with medication. However, in recent years, animals in the Gulf region have been testing positive for heartworm, despite being on a prevention medicine. This has many people worried about a potential resistant superbug.

In response to the growing cases, the American Heartworm Society and Companion Animal Parasite Council met earlier this year to "explore the potential relationships between resistance to heartworm products and veterinary and pet owner compliance, loss of product efficacy and heartworm testing and treatment protocols." 

For instance, 50 percent of people who buy heartworm preventative do not give the medication to their dogs as directed. The efficacy of heartworm preventative is greatly compromised if not given as intended.

The meeting concluded that more research is necessary, but that the investigation should not lead to dropping heartworm medicine, since year-round use is still the most effective way to prevent the deadly disease.

In human healthcare, there’s so much talk of antibiotic resistant supeprbugs that I avoid excessive medications and vaccines when possible, for both myself and my dogs. However, heartworm preventative is one medication I don’t skip with the pups. It’s such a serious disease and I hope that the possibility of a superbug is unfounded.

For more information on heartworm prevention, symptoms, and endemic areas, visit the American Heartworm Society website.

News: Editors
Genius Award to Genetic Researcher
Unlocking secrets of canine DNA

The young son of Stanford University researcher, Prof. Carlos Bustamante, answered the phone this morning at 7 a.m., and handing the phone to his father said, “Oh, it’s for you.” News of his $500,000 MacArthur Award (“genius award”) came as a welcomed surprise to Bustamante. His work focuses on understanding the evolution and interactions of population genetics in dogs, humans and even plants and pathogens.

  One of the most recent findings of Bustamante’s group at Stanford, in collaboration with Cornell and the National Human Genome Research Institute, was that—“in contrast to humans”—many physical traits in dogs are determined by very few genetic regions. For example, a dog with version A of the “snout length” region may have a long, slender muzzle, while version B confers a more standard nose and C an abnormally short schnoz. And let’s say X, Y and Z in the “leg length” region bestow a range of heights from short to tall. That would mean that in this example an A/X dog would have a slender muzzle and short legs like a Dachshund. C/Y might be a Bulldog, while B/Z would be more like a Labrador.   “This mixing and matching of chunks of DNA is how breeders were able to come up with so many different breeds in a relatively short amount of time,” writes Stanford’s Krista Conger.   Fascinating findings and because complex traits in humans are more difficult to discern, their work with dogs has implications for human health as well.

 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Microchipping Success Story
Lost dog found after 7 years

Jake was a 6-month old puppy in 2003 when he disappeared from his yard the day after Thanksgiving. That was in Michigan. He was apparently dropped off at a kennel in Kentucky this week where a staff member found him in an after-hours kennel wearing a shock collar and nothing else to give any information about him. The scanner picked up the microchip, which prompted a call to Brad Davis, who still lives in Michigan. He thought it was a wrong number until they said they located him because of his dog’s microchip. Davis is headed to Kentucky to pick up Jake.

  Microchipping has led to many successful reunions between people and their dogs, though most of them are not seven years later. Of course, Jake can hardly be the same dog that he was as a puppy back in 2003. Still, it’s wonderful for Davis and his family to know that Jake is alive and well, even if they’ll never know what happened the day he disappeared or in all the days since.   Have you or anyone you know been reunited with a dog because that dog was microchipped?

 

News: Editors
Therapeutic Trees
Another health bonus from walking your dog

The New York Times had an interesting article about studies examining the health benefits of nature. Researchers have found that spending time in places with trees aplenty, such as parks and forests, is good for us and has a positive affect on our immune functions. Seems as if stress reduction is one factor that the scientists attribute to phytnocides, the “airborne chemicals that plants emit to protect them from rotting insects.”  The Japanese have taken this to heart and even partake in a practice called “forest bathing.” 

 

As The Times notes, “the scientists found that being among plants produced lower concentrations of cortisol, lower pulse rate, and lower blood pressure, among other things.” So for all of you who walk your dogs in the woods, not only are you doing the right thing by providing sensory stimulation and exercise for them but you too get a healthy boost from the trees!

 

News: Guest Posts
Law & Order: Canine Unit?
New DNA database to aid dog-fighting investigations

On the heels of Charles Siebert’s eye-opening examination of the links between animal cruelty and other types of violence (“The Animal-Cruelty Syndrome,” New York Times, 6/7/10), the University of California, Davis, and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals have announced the creation of the nation’s first criminal dog-fighting DNA database. Known as the Canine CODIS (Combined DNA Index System), the database is designed to support criminal investigations and prosecutions in dog-fighting cases. As Siebert pointed out, the conviction of Michael Vick on dog-fighting charges in 2007 and the growing awareness of links between dog fighting and domestic violence and other crimes has made dog fighting a higher law enforcement priority. I’m thrilled to see advanced technology and new energy brought to this terrible practice.

 

How will it work? The Canine CODIS contains DNA profiles from dogs seized during dog-fighting investigations and from unidentified samples collected at suspected dog-fighting venues. DNA analysis and matching will help law enforcement identify relationships between dogs and establish connections between breeders, trainers and dog-fight operators. Blood collected from dog fighting sites also will be searched against the Canine CODIS database to identify the source. Am I the only one seeing a new Law & Order franchise here?   The Humane Society of Missouri is also a partner in creating the database, supplying 400 original and initial samples of DNA collected from dogs seized in July 2009 during the nation’s largest dog-fighting raid, as well as the Louisiana SPCA. The database will be maintained at the University of California, Davis, Veterinary Genetics Laboratory.

 

News: Guest Posts
Must Read
Connecting animal cruelty to other forms of violence

Bark contributor Charles Siebert explores how we are taking animal abuse more seriously than ever before—with tougher legislation, law enforcement, veterinary forensics and explorations into the neuroscience of empathy. “The Animal-Cruelty Syndrome” (New York Times Magazine, 6/13/10) is a tough read in parts, with graphic examples (be prepared), but hopefully signals a turning point in this previously underreported and inadequately addressed violence.

 

View the accompanying slideshow of abused and/or neglected Pit Bulls in New York shelters.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Double Checking
New law requires Ga. shelters to scan pets twice for microchips

Last year I wrote about a study of animal shelters that found 12 percent of microchips go undetected on the first scan. Thanks to a new law, lost Georgia pets can rest assured that there’s a greater chance of being identified and reunited with their families. House Bill 1106, sponsored by Representative Gene Maddox and Senator Greg Goggans, will go into effect on July 1st requiring shelters statewide to scan pets twice for microchips--once at intake and another time before euthanasia.

In the bill’s infancy, there was concern that the cost of requiring microchip scanning would prevent the legislation from being passed. To ensure the bill’s success, the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery (AKC CAR) pledged 25 microchip scanners to Georgia shelters. HomeAgain and Bayer followed suit by pledging an additional 20 scanners each.

Microchips are inexpensive and easy to implant. According to the AKC CAR, microchipped pets are up to 20 times more likely to return home. Hopefully, Georgia’s legislation will encourage more people to microchip their pets and will help reunite more lost pets with their families.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Which Pooch Pooped?
DNA has the answer

A fancy condominium in the Baltimore area is plagued by a problem facing many neighborhoods around the country and indeed the world. At least one dog guardian is not scooping the poop, and the result is a mess that has residents upset. Steve Frans is a board member who has a dog, and is embarrassed by the mess that residents and guests must deal with. He has proposed a solution to the problem.

  Frans’ idea is to require everyone who lives there with a dog to submit a sample of the dog’s saliva and pay $50 for the DNA testing of that saliva. There would also be a $10 per month fee for having the staff scoop the poop that is not cleaned up so that it can be tested for a match. Both saliva and feces contain DNA. Whoever is responsible for not cleaning up the mess (the person, not the dog!) will be fined $500.   Using DNA to identify offenders of this kind is not new. In Petah Tikva, Israel, as Julia Kamysz Lane wrote about in 2008, dog guardians were rewarded with pet supplies for submitting their dog’s poop for DNA identification and offenders whose dog’s poop was found unscooped (based on DNA matching) were to be fined.   Do you think using DNA to identify the offenders is a reasonable option? In what other ways could they solve the problem?

Pages