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Company Offers Pet Burials at Sea
Another sign of love for dogs
A sea burial certificate commemorates the scattering of ashes

How people say good-bye to loved ones is a strong indication of how much they were valued. Meaningful or elaborate ceremonies as well as permanent tributes are ways that people show how important someone was to them. Whether it’s the Egyptian pyramids of Giza, King Tutankhamun’s tomb, the mausoleum that includes the Terra Cotta Army of the Chinese Emperor Qin Shi Huang or the Taj Majal, people have often demonstrated great love and respect for someone who has died.

In recent years, dogs’ places in our hearts and homes have become every more solidified, and the way that we mourn them is keeping pace. It is now common for people to make donations in deceased pets’ honor, to bury them near the rest of the family, to attend grief support groups and to make memory books to help cope with the loss. It’s in keeping with the increased status of dogs as members of our family that it is now possible to conduct burials at sea for dogs.

The company New England Burials at Sea offers services for pets complete with ash scatterings at sea. A typical service may follow the scattering of ashes with a poem and placing flowers or wreaths in the ocean. People then receive a sea burial certificate on which the time, date, and latitude and longitude of the ash scattering are recorded. If desired, a picture of the pet is also on the certificate.

As dogs’ place in our hearts and lives continues to expand in today’s modern society, so does our respect for them in death. A proper, meaningful good-bye allows people to acknowledge the magnitude of love they have for their dogs. Hopefully, this helps with the grieving process.

How have you bid a fond farewell to a beloved pet?

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer whose clinical work over the last 17 years has focused on the evaluation and treatment of serious behavioral problems in dogs, especially aggression. Karen has been writing the behavior column for The Bark since 2012 and wrote The Bark’s training column and various other articles for eight years before that. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University, and teaches a tropical field biology course in Costa Rica. Karen writes an animal column, The London Zoo, which appear in The Arizona Daily Sun and is the author of five books on canine training and behavior. She is working on her next book, which she expects to be published in 2017.

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