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Five Essential Tips for Training Dogs to Sit Politely Instead of Jumping

It’s that time of year when good doggy manners manner. Sophia Yin, DVM has these simple pointers for teaching how not to jump up on your guests, but how to be good hosts and greet them by sitting politely. Her techniques, like using high reinforcement rates, can be easily applied to other training essentials, like the “holy grail” of a solid recall. Give it a try! —Editor’s Note

Everyone knows that you should reward good behavior and ignore bad behaviors, right? So if your dog jumps on you, ignore the jumping and then reward with a treat when he sits, right? WRONG! This answer is wrong enough that if you're one of my interns and, after your first several sessions, you still think it’s right, you will not be an intern for much longer. Why? Because if this is the information you provide to clients, many will fail and turn to more punitive methods. The following are 5 essential tips for approaching problem behaviors such as jumping.

Tip 1: Don’t ignore the unwanted behavior. Remove the rewards for unwanted behavior instead. It turns out that if you ignore unwanted behavior, you may accidentally be rewarding it. You should instead remove rewards for unwanted behavior-which is very different. For instance, most clients complain that they are ignoring their dog when he jumps but they aren’t getting the results they want. They don't realize that the dog does not perceive their actions as removal of attention. Their hands are still dangling like tug toys or they are still walking around which makes them look interactive, see the video below. What owners should be told is to remove what their dog wants, attention in this case, within 0.5 seconds and do it in a way that the dog perceives that they have removed their attention. That may mean standing up completely straight and holding both arms folded against their body while they stand silent and stationary. Or it may just mean pulling their hands away and back to their body. If they remove their attention in a clear manner, they will see a quick and clear response from their dog.

Tip 2: Train the desired behavior first. It’s essential that the humans know to first train the good behavior—sitting politely—or it could take the dog forever to figure out what else will earn rewards besides jumping. A five or ten-minute training session where the dog earns 10-50 rewards is generally adequate.

Tip 3: Use a high reinforcement rate first. Then quickly and systematically reduce and vary the rate. Once the dog is sitting, the owners need to reward at a high reinforcement rate. Giving just one treat for sitting often won't hack it. The first treat you give is for sitting, but additional treats are for remaining seated so that Rover doesn’t just get up and try to jump again. At first, the treats should come rapidly—enough to keep Rover seated—but as soon as Rover is sitting stably at that treat interval, the interval should be increased and varied. This process should be repeated until Rover is sitting automatically and remaining stably seated. Then the focus should be on switching to other rewards such as petting and praise.

Tip 4: Use a flash lure to prevent Rover from getting the first jump in. If your dog tends to jump on you and then sit afterwards, you should change your strategy FAST so that you don't accidentally reward this chain of behaviors—jump then sit. You can add in what I call a flash lure before Rover has a chance to jump. As he’s running over to you but before he has a chance to jump (preferably when he’s about 2 steps away), suddenly flash a treat right to his nose level by just straightening your arm. This will cause him to stop will all four feet on the floor. When he's completely stationary, you can quickly bring the treat all the way back to your body and clearly out of his reach so he knows he doesn't get it yet. Once he sits, then he gets the treat.

Tip 5: Practice a lot in a short period of time. Because your goal is to develop a new greeting habit with your dog, it’s essential that you practice a lot over a short period of time. For instance, if you set up the situation where your dog is excited to see you five times a day and each time he earns 10-20 rewards and never has a chance to jump then by tomorrow he will probably be sitting automatically in this situation. By the end of the week, the good behavior should be a habit!

That's, of course, assuming that in between your practice sessions he didn't have a chance to get rewards for the opposite behavior!

These are some important subtleties that can help you get behavior changes quickly. It’s important to apply these principles to all training exercises to get the fastest progress.

 

 

Used with permission from Dr. Sophia Yin, visit her on drsophiayin.com

 

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Sophia Yin, DVM, is an applied animal behaviorist. A long-time The Bark contributing editor, she is also the author of two behavior books.

CommentsPost a Comment
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Submitted by Szabo | December 19 2013 |

The video wasn't very informative, but the article is helpful. thanks. I had trouble hearing the video. The dog was excitedly circling a woman and running back to a woman off screen (Dr Yin?). The woman on-screen got corrected repeatedly. The dog seemed fine.

Submitted by Anna | December 20 2013 |

One of my dogs has always had a habit of jumping up - First on everybody, and now only on my husband (but only occasionally, when he has been travelling overseas et.c.). This is what I found finally worked on her: after reading the book "Calming signals", I started to simply turn my back on her, arms crossed, totally calm, if she jumps. That makes her stop jumping immediately. Then I wait a few second and when I am sure she is calm, I greet her and give her attention. If she starts to consider jumping again, I repeat the procedure. I only did it a few times over a few days, and she hasn't jumped on me since. Everything else we have tried over time didn't work: ignoring, treats of sitting, punishment for jumping, etc.

She does have her own strategy for self-management that works as well though: often she doesn't come to the door to greet anymore, but instead starts playing with a bone, throwing it in the air so it falls down with a loud noise. Then when the person come over to greet her, she rolls on her back and expects tummy rubs;-)

Submitted by Heide Geiger-Winings | December 28 2013 |

I could not see much from this video - this dog was not really jumping? How do you work it with multiple dogs who feed off eachother's excitement when greeting me together or when someone rings the bell etc.

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