Mastiff on Agility Course

I want to stand up and applaud for him!
By Karen B. London PhD, December 2015

An English Mastiff running an agility course is well-received by an enthusiastic crowd. So many dogs competing in agility are a blur of feet and fur, presenting a serious challenge to their human handlers to keep up. This dog is more mellow and a great deal slower than a lot of other dogs, but his efforts are appreciated. His body is not perfectly suited to the sport, but he does it anyway, and that’s what makes it so beautiful.

It’s a bit like watching a weight lifter compete in figure skating or a shot putter attempting to run a marathon. It’s clearly not the perfect match between body type and event, but just participating is admirable. In this case, the English Mastiff is not breaking any speed records, but he completes the course.

I love how the handler works to build the dog’s enthusiasm with patience and an upbeat energy. The dog continues at his pace, not looking overly exuberant, but showing no signs of reluctance either. My favorite part is the slow, methodical approach he takes with the weave poles. I imagine that for many handlers whose dogs tend to miss a pole or two, this surefire approach has its appeal.

I love seeing a dog from a rarely-represented breed competing in agility. As long as a veterinarian approves a dog for the activity, I’m all for it. (I mention this because not all large, big-boned dogs can safely handle the jumping and other demands of agility.) A good quality of life is about participating and having fun, NOT about being the fastest or most skilled out there.

I’ve seen tons of Border Collies and other herding dogs compete in agility, along with a variety of other breeds. I have fond memories of teaching a beginning agility class years ago with both a Newfoundland and an Italian Greyhound attending. It was fun for all the humans to see different breeds negotiate the obstacles and show clear preferences. The Newfie loved the table most of all, while the IG was a huge fan of the tunnel.

Agility is for every breed, including mixed breed dogs, but it’s certainly the case that not all types of dogs excel in the same way at the sport. It’s a joy to watch any dog take part if they have a willingness to do so.

Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer who specializes in working with dogs with serious behavioral problems, including aggression. She is the author of five books on canine training and behavior.