Mislabeled Food

Study finds that ingredients listed on packages differ from what's inside.
By JoAnna Lou, October 2014, Updated October 2020

With recent allegations of mislabeled food, we've never been so far removed from where our meals come from. Last year a study across 21 states found that as much as 33 percent of seafood in the United States is sold as a different product than what's listed on the package. And it's not just human food.

After reading about horse meat found in ground beef products sold in European, California's Chapman University decided to explore mislabeling in the pet food industry. Students extracted DNA from different brands of commercial dog and cat food to test for the presence of eight meat types--beef, goat, lamb, chicken, goose, turkey, pork, and horse.

Of the 52 products included in the study, 20 were potentially mislabeled and one contained a meat ingredient that could not be verified. 16 included a meat type not listed in the ingredients and three substituted a listed meat for a different type. Pork was the most common undeclared ingredient.

The researchers noted that while the pet food was mislabeled, it was unclear if it was accidental or intentional, or at which point in the production chain it took place.

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It's not always a matter of the company itself being deceptive, but that there are so many layers of food production these days. Earlier this month Blue Buffalo revealed that a supplier's mislabeling of ingredients may have caused some of their pet food products to contain poultry by-product meal instead of 100 percent chicken meal.

Inaccurate ingredient lists are not only frustrating (who wants to pay a premium for whole meat ingredients that turn out to be cheap byproducts), but also dangerous (how can you find food for a dog with allergies if you can't trust the labels?). The fact that this problem is happening with human food as well means that this is tied to a much larger problem with the way our production chains operate. This information makes a hefty case for making your own meals--for you and your pup!

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Photo by Buzz Farmers/flickr.

JoAnna Lou is a New York City-based researcher, writer and agility enthusiast.