No Charges for NFL Player Who Taunts Police K9

Actions found to be more foolish than felonious
By Cameron Woo, November 2015

Head slaps, pounding on pads, emotional rants—all part of the pre-game rituals practiced by professional football players to psyche themselves and their teammates up for an afternoon of contact sport. A few Sundays ago, Oakland Raider linebacker Ray-Ray Armstrong may have crossed the line with his pre-game histrionics. Shortly before kickoff of the Pittsburgh Steelers-Oakland Raiders game (November 8), Armstrong lifted his shirt, began pounding his chest and barking at an Allegheny County Sheriff Office bomb-sniffing dog, according to Chief Deputy Kevin Kraus. Allegedly, the player also told the deputy holding the K-9 service dog to “send the dog.” “The dog was going crazy,” Krauss said, “the deputy was trying to control the dog the best she could.”

Such behavior is no laughing matter … taunting a police K-9 carries a third-degree felony charge in Pennsylvania with a maximum sentence of seven years in prison and a $15,000 fine. The targeted deputy reported the incident to a supervisor, who initiated a criminal investigation. Witnesses were questioned, video surveillance reviewed. Two weeks later, the Allegheny County District Attorney has decided not to press charges against the overzealous football player, releasing this statement:

“The district attorney and the sheriff agree this was not a malicious act, but did create an unnecessary security risk. The office will communicate with the authorities in California as to how we can address this matter.”

In short, case closed. Not surprisingly, most sports call-in shows who weighed in on the subject thought the potential criminal charges were “absurd” and “silly”—but given the important job that K-9 service dogs perform, shouldn’t there be some consequences to interfering with their duty? What do you think … was this a case of football foolishness or a felony offense?