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No Name Dogs
Helping “rez” dogs

Dogs may be our oldest companions, but around the world, far too many are homeless, with an average life expectancy of three years. This brutal fact is compounded by canine reproduction rates, which result in tsunamis of puppies who suffer the same fate.

In southern Alberta, Canada, homeless “rez” dogs are now getting a helping hand from the Dogs with No Names project, brainchild of animal health technologist Lori Rogers and veterinarian Judith Samson-French. In 2009, they designed a pilot program to reduce the population of homeless dogs on two First Nations reserves in southern Alberta by implanting a contraceptive under the skin of females. To date, volunteers with the project have successfully implanted more than a hundred dogs and prevented the birth of hundreds of thousands of pups.

To support this effort, Dr. Samson-French has recently published a new book, Dogs with No Names: In Pursuit of Courage, Hope and Purpose; 100 percent of the profi ts go to the project. Go online to order and to find out more about their work.